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Figure Drawing : The Structural Anatomy and Expressive Design of the Human Form,9780131830486
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Figure Drawing : The Structural Anatomy and Expressive Design of the Human Form

by
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780131830486

ISBN10:
0131830481
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2004
Publisher(s):
Pearson College Div
List Price: $110.40
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Summary

A concise but comprehensive book about all matters pertaining to drawing the human figure, this well-illustrated and accurate guide demonstrates the interplay of structure, anatomy, design, and expression in effective figure drawing; and shows how the integration of these four factors is essential in drawing the figure in a compelling and lucid manner.Topics covered in this book are the structural, anatomical, design, and expressive factors in figure drawing. The book's text is supported by many illustrations, photos, and works of art.For professional and amateur artists.

Table of Contents

Foreword xi
Preface xiii
1 THE EVOLUTION OF INTENT: Major Factors and Concepts in Figure Drawing 1(34)
Some Common Denominators
1(8)
The Emergence of Interpretive Figure Drawing
9(26)
2 THE STRUCTURAL FACTOR: The Figure As a Structure 35(44)
Some General Observations
35(7)
A Planar Approach to Human Form
42(3)
The Interjoining of Planes and Masses
45(4)
Structure and Value
49(3)
Structural Supports and Suspensions in the Figure
52(3)
Structural Aspects of Foreshortening
55(5)
Seeing Shape, Direction, and Edge
60(5)
Structural Aspects of the Draped Figure and Its Environment
65(10)
Suggested Exercises
75(4)
3 THE ANATOMICAL FACTOR: Part One. The Skeleton 79(42)
Some General Observations
79(1)
Bones of the Skull
80(3)
Bones of the Spinal Column
83(2)
Bones of the Rib Cage
85(1)
Bones of the Shoulder Girdle
86(3)
Bones of the Pelvis
89(2)
Bones of the Arm
91(7)
Bones of the Leg
98(3)
Skeletal Proportions
101(4)
The Skeleton in Figure Drawing
105(8)
Suggested Exercises
113(8)
4 THE ANATOMICAL FACTOR: Part Two. The Muscles 121(74)
Some General Observations
121(1)
Muscles of the Head
122(2)
Surface Forms of the Head
124(5)
Muscles of the Neck
129(3)
Muscles of the Torso
132(9)
Muscles of the Arm
141(10)
Muscles of the Leg
151(18)
Skin and Fat
169(1)
Further Observations on Surface Forms
169(21)
Suggested Exercises
190(5)
5 THE DESIGN FACTOR: The Relational Content of Figure Drawing 195(62)
Some General Observations
195(6)
The Visual Elements
201(27)
Line
201(6)
Value
207(4)
Shape
211(7)
Volume
218(4)
Texture
222(6)
The Elements in Action
228(7)
Direction
229(2)
Rhythm
231(1)
Handling or Character
231(1)
Location and Proximity
232(1)
Subdivision
232(1)
Visual Weight
232(1)
Tension
233(1)
Figurative Influences
234(1)
Examples of Relational Activities in Figure Drawing
235(7)
Anatomy as an Agent of Design
242(1)
The Figure and the Environment
243(9)
Suggested Exercises
252(5)
6 THE EXPRESSIVE FACTOR: The Emotive Content of Figure Drawing 257(30)
Some General Observations
257(5)
The Inherent Expression of the Elements
262(6)
Distortion
268(2)
The Expressive Role of the Medium
270(3)
Examples of Expression in Figure Drawing
273(11)
Suggested Exercises
284(3)
7 THE FACTORS INTERACTING: Some Examples 287(38)
Differing Formulas
287(23)
The Pathologies of Figure Drawing
310(1)
Perceptual Defects
310(3)
Organizational Defects
313(1)
Expressive Defects
314(1)
The Role of Media in Expression
315(2)
In Conclusion
317(8)
8 A GALLERY OF VISUAL RESOURCES 325(28)
GLOSSARY 353(2)
BIBLIOGRAPHY 355(2)
INDEX 357

Excerpts

That the five earlier incarnations ofFigure Drawingmet with immediate and substantial acceptance among artists and students alike is a matter of personal gratification and a dependable sign that something about the book's overall presentation and character has struck a responsive chord among those who want to reinforce their interest in figure drawing with more information and options. This new edition tries to serve those interests with even greater clarity and effect. The earlier editions--expanded in some places, simplified in others, and further strengthening the original text--were shaped by the opportunities I have had in the intervening years of examining the book's effect on countless readers by the good counsel of colleagues arid students, and by the insights and experiences that time provides. The thing about time, though, is that it keeps on providing new notions. Although with each edition I was satisfied with the book's essential form and content, it occurred to me after a few years that yet another revision was in order. So it is again. I am, however, a staunch believer in the old adage, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." Consequently, this sixth edition continues in the same vein as its predecessors, with a few useful additions and changes. Again, I have included a number of colorplates to show how "the queen of the visual elements" can amplify our creative purposes. Most of the works new to this edition are by contemporary artists, and each strongly amplifies various matters of importance in the text. Additionally, I have expanded Chapter 8 with photographs showing the figure's forms in ways I hope the reader will find useful as a source of study and practice. As for the text, the change I am proudest of is that rarest of all occurrences: a reversal of the usual tendency for new editions to gain weight. This edition's slightly reduced text is, I believe, clearer and stronger than previous texts, and it contains some useful adjustments in presenting the relative importance of the book's several themes. If some of these additions and changes originated with me, many came from readers, students, and colleagues too numerous to list here, and I want to thank them in this public way for helping me to more closely realize my goals on this sixth time around. Always the optimist, I have high hopes for this latest revision. But, always the artist and teacher, I know in my bones that it is the quality and quantity of good figure drawings reproduced in the text that will give this book its ultimate worth. For that important reason, I have tried to reproduce figure drawings that represent a wide range of styles, themes, and eras, though I am less concerned with when they were done than with what they say and how well they say it. As before, this edition is designed to assist the art student, the amateur, the art teacher, and the practicing artist in developing a more extensive understanding of the figurative and abstract considerations of drawing observed or envisioned human forms. I continue to hold the single assumption that the artist-reader's interest in expanding his or her understanding is motivated by a wish to comprehend those universal qualities present in the best examples of figure drawing by old and contemporary masters alike, rather than by a wish for ready-made formulas and techniques. Although five of the eight chapters provide suggested exercises, these exercises are intended to clarify and reinforce the particulars and potentialities of the chapter's subject, not to suggest canons of figure drawing. The exercises may be simplified, embellished, otherwise varied, or even be bypassed without interrupting the flow of the text. The termfigure drawingas used here refers to drawings of the draped as well as nude figure, and drawings of parts of the figure or drawings in which the figure represents only a small part of the configuration. Very oft


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