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Literacy's Beginnings : Supporting Young Readers and Writers,9780205299317
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Literacy's Beginnings : Supporting Young Readers and Writers

by ;
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780205299317

ISBN10:
0205299318
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
11/1/1999
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $64.00

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This is the 3rd edition with a publication date of 11/1/1999.
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    Literacy's Beginnings : Supporting Young Readers and Writers




Summary

This book offers an integrated, developmental approach to differentiating reading and writing instruction for children, birth to age 8. "Literacy's Beginnings" offers an integrated approach to reading and writing instruction keyed to the "five" typical developmental stages through which most children pass (the IRA/NAEYC phases of literacy). "Current and future teachers of children from birth to age 8"

Author Biography

Donald J. Richgels is a Professor in the Department of Literacy Education at Northern Illinois University. Lea M. McGee is a Professor of Literacy at Ohio State University.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Understanding Children's Literacy Development
1(30)
Key Concepts
2(1)
Language Development
2(5)
Schemas and Learning
2(2)
The Relation between Language and Learning
4(3)
Literacy Development
7(2)
A Piagetian Approach
7(1)
A Vygotskian Approach
7(2)
Children's Concepts about Written Language
9(4)
Ted's Delight: Two Children's Reading and Writing
9(2)
Ted's and Carrie's Concepts about Written Language
11(1)
Learning in Social and Cultural Contexts
12(1)
Concepts about Written Language: Functions, Meanings, Forms, and Meaning-Form Links
13(1)
Written and Spoken Language Functions
13(2)
Written and Spoken Language Meanings
15(1)
Semantics in Spoken Language
15(1)
Meaning in Written Language
16(1)
Written Language Forms
16(5)
Syntax in Spoken Language
17(1)
Forms in Written Language
17(4)
Meaning-Form Links
21(3)
Phonological System in Spoken Language
21(1)
Meaning-Form Links, in Written Language
22(2)
Developmental Changes in Children's Reading and Writing
24(3)
Logographic Reading and Writing
24(1)
Alphabetic Reading and Writing
25(2)
Orthographic Reading and Writing
27(1)
Chapter Summary
27(1)
Applying the Information
28(1)
Going Beyond the Text
29(1)
References
29(2)
From Birth to Three Years: Literacy Beginners
31(24)
Key Concepts
32(1)
What Literacy Beginners Show Us
32(7)
``Let's Read, Daddy'': Experiences with Books and Other Familiar Print
32(1)
Concepts about Literacy from Early Book Experiences
33(2)
``Look at All These Raindrops'': Experiences with Crayons and Markers
35(2)
Concepts about Literacy from Early Writing Experiences
37(2)
Home Influences on Literacy Learning
39(9)
Booksharing
40(6)
Environmental Print
46(1)
Oral Language Interactions
47(1)
Differences in Home Literacy and Language Interactions
47(1)
Implications for Child Care and Nursery School
48(2)
Developmentally Appropriate Practice
48(1)
Literacy Materials
49(1)
Responding to Children's Literacy Activities
50(1)
Chapter Summary
50(1)
Applying the Information
50(2)
Going Beyond the Text
52(1)
References
52(3)
From Three to Five Years: Novice Readers and Writers
55(28)
Key Concepts
56(1)
Who Are Novice Readers and Writers?
56(3)
New Insights about Communicating with Written Language
56(1)
Examples of Novices
57(2)
Repertoire of Knowledges
59(1)
Meaning
59(6)
Constructing the Meaning of Environmental Print
59(1)
Constructing Meaning While Listening to Story and Information Book Read Alouds
60(3)
Writing Meaningful Messages
63(2)
Written Language Forms
65(6)
Alphabet Letters
65(1)
Signatures
66(2)
Texts
68(3)
Meaning-Form Links
71(4)
Contextual Dependency
71(1)
Matching Print to Spoken Language: More Than Contextual Dependency
72(1)
Drawing and Writing
72(2)
Phonological Awareness
74(1)
Written Language Functions
75(2)
A Word of Caution
77(1)
Chapter Summary
77(1)
Applying the Information
78(2)
Going Beyond the Text
80(1)
References
80(3)
From Five to Seven Years: Experimenting Readers and Writers
83(27)
Key Concepts
84(1)
Who Are Experimenters?
84(3)
Experimenters' New Awareness
84(2)
Examples of Experimenters
86(1)
Experimenting with Meaning
87(1)
Experimenting with Forms
87(7)
Concept of Word
88(1)
Concept of Word Boundaries
89(1)
Texts
89(5)
Experimenting with Meaning-Form Links
94(10)
Sounding Literate
95(3)
Being Precise
98(1)
Using Sound--Letter Relationships
99(5)
Experimenting with Functions of Written Language
104(1)
A Word of Caution
104(1)
Chapter Summary
105(1)
Applying the Information
106(1)
Going Beyond the Text
107(1)
References
107(3)
From Six to Eight Years: Conventional Readers and Writers
110(29)
Key Concepts
111(1)
Who Are Conventional Readers and Writers?
111(3)
Examples: Experimenters versus Conventional Readers and Writers
112(2)
Meaning Construction
114(3)
Meaning Making in Reading: Constructing Interpretations of Literature
114(2)
Meaning Making in Writing
116(1)
Written Language Forms
117(11)
Concept of Word
118(1)
Story Form
118(4)
Expository Text
122(6)
Meaning-Form Links
128(5)
Spelling
128(5)
Functions
133(1)
The Traditional End Points: Reading and Word Identification, Vocabulary, and Comprehension
133(1)
Chapter Summary
134(2)
Applying the Information
136(1)
Going Beyond the Text
136(1)
References
136(3)
Literacy-Rich Classrooms
139(32)
Key Concepts
140(1)
Developmentally Appropriate Practice
140(2)
Characteristics of Literacy-Rich Classrooms
142(1)
Learners
142(1)
The Classroom
142(1)
Literacy Materials
143(5)
Materials
143(1)
The Case for Quality Literature
144(1)
Classroom Literature Collection
144(4)
Physical Arrangement of Classrooms
148(4)
The Case for Library, Writing, and Computer Centers
148(1)
Library Center
148(1)
Writing Center
149(1)
Computer Center
149(3)
Literacy Routines
152(4)
The Case for Classroom Routines
152(1)
Reading Aloud and Telling Stories
153(2)
Independent Reading and Writing
155(1)
Sharing Response-to-Literature Activities
155(1)
Culturally Sensitive and Integrated Curriculum
156(3)
The Case for Culturally Sensitive and Integrated Curriculum
156(1)
Culturally Sensitive Curriculum
157(1)
Literature Theme Units
158(1)
Integrated Content Units
158(1)
Assessment, Instruction, and Grouping
159(4)
The Case for a Variety of Instruction
160(1)
The Case for Multiple Grouping Patterns
161(1)
Instructional Framework
161(2)
Chapter Summary
163(1)
Applying the Information
164(2)
Going Beyond the Text
166(1)
References
166(5)
Supporting Literacy Learning in Preschools
171(32)
Key Concepts
172(1)
The Preschool Context
172(3)
What Preschoolers Learn about Literacy
172(1)
The Preschool Setting: Space and Materials
173(2)
Reading and Writing in Mrs. Miller's Preschool Classroom
175(3)
Children at Play
175(2)
The Teacher at Work: Mrs. Miller's Role
177(1)
Preparing for Phonemic Awareness
178(5)
The ``I Can Hear'' Activity
179(2)
Making Rhymes
181(2)
Preparing for Literary Awareness, Story Concepts, and Concepts of Print
183(3)
Literary Awareness
183(1)
Story Concepts
184(1)
Concepts of Print
184(2)
Preschool Experiences with Book Reading
186(4)
Shared Reading in Miss Leslie's Classroom
187(2)
Miss Leslie's Roles in an Interactive Read Aloud
189(1)
Preschool Experiences with Writing
190(6)
The Preschool Writing Center
191(1)
The Sign-In Procedure
192(1)
Shared Writing
192(1)
Story Writing
193(2)
The Teacher's Role in Writing Activities: Using Written Language Talk
195(1)
Preschool Experiences with Play
196(3)
Dramatic-Play-with-Print Centers
196(2)
Storytelling and Playing
198(1)
The Teacher's Role in Play: Letting Children Take the Lead
199(1)
Another Look: The Teacher's Roles
199(1)
Chapter Summary
200(1)
Applying the Information
200(1)
Going Beyond the Text
201(1)
References
201(2)
Supporting Literacy Learning in Kindergarten
203(36)
Key Concepts
204(1)
The Kindergarten Context: What's New Here?
204(4)
What Kindergartners Learn about Literacy
204(1)
The Teacher's Role
205(1)
The Kindergarten Setting: Space and Materials
206(2)
Writing and Reading in Mrs. Poremba's Kindergarten
208(3)
Kindergartners as Researchers
209(1)
The Teacher as Guide: Mrs. Poremba Guides Reading and Discussion
209(2)
Helping Children Attend to Sounds in Words
211(8)
The ``What Can You Show Us?'' Activity
212(4)
Returning to ``Rounding Up the Rhymes''
216(3)
Kindergarten Experiences with Reading
219(7)
Using Classroom Print
219(1)
Shared Reading
220(3)
Shared Reading with Big Books
223(3)
Kindergarten Experiences with Writing
226(6)
Journal Writing
226(2)
The Extended Sign-In Procedure
228(1)
Shared Writing
229(3)
Kindergarten Experiences with Play
232(3)
Dramatic-Play-with-Print Centers
232(2)
Dramatizing Informational Books
234(1)
Another Look: The Teacher's Roles
235(1)
Chapter Summary
236(1)
Applying the Information
237(1)
Going Beyond the Text
237(1)
References
237(2)
Supporting Literacy Learning in First Grade
239(36)
Key Concepts
240(1)
What's New Here?
240(4)
Learning to Read Conventionally
241(2)
Balanced First Grade Reading and Writing Programs
243(1)
Basal Approaches to First Grade Reading Instruction
244(11)
Reading in Mrs. Walker's First Grade
247(8)
Guided Reading Approach to First Grade Reading
255(11)
Characteristics of Guided Reading
256(1)
Guided Reading Instruction in Mrs. Tran's First Grade
256(10)
Writing Instruction in First Grade
266(6)
Journal Writing
266(1)
Writing Workshop
267(5)
Chapter Summary
272(1)
Applying the Information
273(1)
Going Beyond the Text
273(1)
References
273(2)
Supporting Literacy Learning Beyond First Grade
275(33)
Key Concepts
276(1)
What's New Here?
276(2)
Increasing Expectations for Traditional Skills and Child-Centered Classrooms
276(1)
New Competence
277(1)
A Balanced Reading and Writing Program
277(1)
Using Writing and Reading Workshop
278(5)
Writing Workshop
278(4)
Reading Workshop
282(1)
Reading and Writing Narratives
283(10)
Core Literature Approach
283(2)
Expanding Comprehension and Interpretation
285(8)
Reading and Writing Poetry
293(2)
Enjoying Poetry
293(2)
Poetic Elements
295(1)
Reading and Writing Informational Text
295(5)
Comprehension of Informational Books
295(1)
Content Units
296(2)
Writing Informational Texts
298(1)
Content-Specific Vocabulary
299(1)
Learning Conventions
300(4)
Word Study
301(1)
Spelling Programs
302(2)
Chapter Summary
304(1)
Applying the Information
304(1)
Going Beyond the Text
304(1)
References
305(3)
Diverse Learners
308(31)
Key Concepts
309(1)
Learners at Risk
309(4)
Using Observations to Modify Instruction
309(4)
Literacy-Intervention Programs for At-Risk Learners At-Risk Revisited
313(1)
Special-Needs Learners
313(2)
Supporting Special-Needs Children's Literacy
313(2)
Avoiding Reductionist Teaching
315(1)
Learners from Diverse Cultural Backgrounds
315(8)
Cultural Influences on Learning
316(1)
Culturally Responsive Instruction
316(3)
Culturally Sensitive Instruction: A Summary
319(1)
Culturally Sensitive Instruction in Multicultural Settings
319(4)
Children from Diverse Language Backgrounds
323(10)
Learners Who Speak Nonmainstream Dialects of English
323(5)
Learners Who Speak English as a Second Language
328(4)
Issues Related to Teaching Children from Diverse Backgrounds
332(1)
Chapter Summary
333(1)
Applying the Information
334(1)
Going Beyond the Text
335(1)
References
335(4)
Assessment
339(34)
Key Concepts
340(1)
A Day in Kindergarten
340(5)
A Day in Ms. Orlando's Classroom
340(4)
Ms. Orlando Reflects and Plans
344(1)
Classroom Assessment
345(4)
Portfolio Assessment Is Multidimensional
346(1)
Portfolio Assessment Is Reflective
347(1)
Portfolio Assessment Is Systematic
347(2)
Portfolio Assessment Is Collaborative
349(1)
Assessment Tools
349(15)
Observations
349(1)
Alphabet Recognition Task
350(1)
Concepts-about-Print Task
350(1)
Phonemic Awareness Assessment
351(1)
Emergent Reading Checklist
351(1)
Running Record
351(5)
Retellings
356(1)
Grand Conversations and Response Journals
357(3)
Compositions
360(4)
Using Portfolios
364(3)
Using Portfolios to Make Instructional Decision
364(1)
Using Portfolios to Support Children's Reflections
365(1)
Using Portfolios to Inform Parents
365(1)
Keeping Portfolios Manageable
366(1)
Chapter Summary
367(1)
Applying the Information
367(3)
Going Beyond the Text
370(1)
References
370(3)
Appendix: Children's Literature 373(6)
Author Index 379(8)
Subject Index 387


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