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Measurement and Evaluation in Physical  Education and Exercise Science,9780805300697
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Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education and Exercise Science

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780805300697

ISBN10:
0805300694
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Benjamin Cummings
List Price: $118.40
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Summary

KEY MESSAGE: This newly revisedMeasurement and Evaluation in Physical Education and Exercise Science, Fifth Editioncontinues to bridge the gap between theory and practice by examining measurement and evaluation techniques in a variety of activity settings-from coaching and teaching to adult education and community programs.KEY TOPICS: Introduction to Measurement and Evaluation, Linking Program Development with Measurement and Evaluation, Basic Statistics, Criteria for Test Selection, Alternative Assessment, Measuring Health-Related Physical Fitness and Physical Activity, Measuring Psychomotor Skills, Measuring Cognitive Knowledge, Measuring Affective Behaviors, Grading, Using Self-Evaluation to Improve Instruction, Measurement and Evaluation in Activity Settings.MARKET: For all readers interested in measurement and evaluation in physical education.

Table of Contents

Preface xvii
Introduction to Measurement and Evaluation
1(24)
Definitions of Test, Measurement, and Evaluation
3(2)
Test
3(1)
Measurement
4(1)
Evaluation
4(1)
Relationships among Test, Measurement, and Evaluation
5(1)
Historical Perspective
5(3)
Current Trends
8(10)
Public Health Initiatives: Healthy People 2010
8(2)
Promotion of Physical Activity
10(1)
Problems with Obesity
11(1)
Evaluation Standards for School-Based Programs
12(3)
Alternative Assessments
15(1)
Rapid Technological Advancements
15(3)
Continued Growth of Activity-Based Programs
18(1)
Uses of Measurement and Evaluation in Physical Education
18(3)
Student Performance
18(2)
Teacher Performance
20(1)
Uses of Measurement and Evaluation in Nonschool Settings
21(4)
Summary
22(1)
Discussion Questions
23(1)
References
23(1)
Representative Readings
24(1)
Linking Program Development with Measurement and Evaluation
25(17)
The Four Learning Domains
27(3)
Health-Related Physical Fitness Domain
27(1)
Psychomotor Domain
28(1)
Cognitive Domain
28(1)
Affective Domain
29(1)
Needs Assessment
30(2)
Program Development
32(10)
Step 1: Establishing a Program Philosophy
33(2)
Step 2: Developing Program Goals
35(1)
Step 3: Planning Program Activities
36(1)
Step 4: Delivering the Program
37(1)
Step 5: Evaluating and Improving the Program
38(2)
Summary
40(1)
Discussion Questions
40(1)
References
40(2)
Basic Statistics
42(43)
Levels of Measurement
44(2)
Nominal Level
44(1)
Ordinal Level
44(1)
Interval Level
45(1)
Ratio Level
46(1)
Displaying Your Data
46(1)
Frequency Distributions
46(3)
Simple Frequency Distribution
46(1)
Grouped Frequency Distribution
47(2)
Graphical Representation of Data
49(3)
Symmetry and Skewness
51(1)
Descriptive Statistics and the Normal Curve
52(1)
Measures of Central Tendency
52(4)
Mode
53(1)
Median
53(1)
Mean
54(2)
Measures of Variability
56(6)
Range
57(1)
Variance
57(2)
Standard Deviation
59(3)
Properties of the Normal Curve
62(1)
Standard Scores
63(6)
Percentile Rank
64(1)
Z-Score
65(2)
T-Score
67(2)
Correlation and Regression
69(1)
Correlation
69(5)
Spearman Rho Rank-Order Correlation
71(1)
Pearson Product-Moment Correlation
71(3)
Regression
74(2)
Multiple Correlation/Regression
76(1)
Tests for Differences
77(1)
t-tests
77(4)
t-test for Independent Samples
77(2)
t-test for Dependent Samples
79(2)
Analysis of Variance (ANOVA)
81(1)
One-Way Analysis of Variance
81(1)
Two-Way Analysis of Variance
81(1)
Computer Applications
82(3)
Summary
83(1)
Discussion Questions
83(1)
Reference
84(1)
Representative Readings
84(1)
Criteria for Test Selection
85(21)
Validity
86(2)
Face Validity
86(1)
Content Validity
87(1)
Construct Validity
87(1)
Concurrent Validity
87(1)
Predictive Validity
88(1)
Reliability
88(3)
Test-Retest Reliability
89(1)
Alternate Form Reliability
90(1)
Split-Half or Odd-Even Reliability
90(1)
Objectivity
91(1)
Validity, Reliability, and Objectivity in Alternative Assessment
92(1)
Relationship among Validity, Reliability, and Objectivity
92(1)
Administrative Concerns in Test Selection
93(7)
Relevance
93(1)
Educational Value
93(1)
Economy
94(1)
Time
95(1)
Enjoyment
95(1)
Norms
95(2)
Discrimination
97(1)
Independence
97(1)
Gender Appropriateness
98(1)
Reliance on Another's Performance
98(1)
Safety
98(1)
Testing Large Groups
99(1)
Ease of Scoring, Interpreting, and Reporting
99(1)
Planning Test Administration
100(6)
Securing Materials and Preparing the Testing Area
100(1)
Knowledge of the Test
101(1)
Recording the Scores
101(1)
Training Testers
102(1)
Practicing Test Items
102(1)
Warming Up
103(1)
Standardizing Instructions
103(1)
Converting, Interpreting, and Evaluating the Results
103(1)
Summary
104(1)
Discussion Questions
105(1)
References
105(1)
Representative Readings
105(1)
Alternative Assessment
106(25)
Defining Alternative Assessment
106(1)
Rationale for Alternative Assessments
107(2)
Accountability
108(1)
Weaknesses of Standard Testing Practices
108(1)
Authenticity
108(1)
Accuracy
109(1)
Validity, Reliability, and Objectivity
109(2)
Validity Issues
109(1)
Reliability Issues
109(1)
Objectivity Issues
109(2)
Types of Alternative Assessments
111(1)
Student Projects
111(1)
Portfolios
111(1)
Event Tasks
112(1)
Student Logs and Journals
112(1)
Observations
112(1)
Scoring Criteria for Alternative Assessments
112(4)
Purpose of Rubrics
114(2)
Guidelines for Developing Rubrics
116(7)
Checklists and Rating Scales
117(6)
Developing Alternative Assessments
123(8)
Student Projects
123(1)
Portfolios
124(2)
Event Tasks
126(1)
Student Logs and Student Journals
127(1)
Summary
128(1)
Discussion Questions
129(1)
Refernces
129(1)
Representative Readings
130(1)
Measuring Health-Related Physical Fitness and Physical Activity
131(69)
Physical Activity and Physical Fitness
133(1)
Components of Health-Related Physical Fitness
134(1)
Testing Children and Youth in Schools
135(2)
Considerations about Fitness Testing
137(2)
Process or Product
137(1)
Factors in Fitness Test Performance
138(1)
Normative Data
139(1)
Measurement of Health-Related Physical Fitness in School Settings
139(6)
Measuring Body Composition
140(2)
Measuring Cardiorespiratory Fitness
142(1)
Measuring Flexibility
143(1)
Measuring Muscular Endurance
144(1)
Measuring Muscular Strength
144(1)
Test Batteries for School Settings
145(14)
President's Challenge
146(1)
FITNESSGRAM/ACTIVITYGRAM
147(12)
Testing Students with Disabilities
159(1)
FITNESSGRAM/ACTIVITYGRAM Modifications for Special Populations
159(1)
Brockport Physical Fitness Test
160(1)
Measuring Physical Activity of Students
160(3)
Methods to Measure Activity
161(1)
Promoting Physical Activity through Testing
162(1)
Testing Adult Populations
163(1)
Purposes of Adult Fitness Testing
163(1)
Pre-Exercise Testing Considerations
164(2)
Pre-Exercise Health Evaluation
164(2)
Fitness Testing Order
166(1)
Measurement of Health-Related Physical Fitness
166(22)
Measuring Body Composition
166(3)
Measuring Cardiorespiratory Fitness
169(12)
Measuring Flexibility
181(2)
Measuring Muscular Endurance
183(2)
Measuring Muscular Strength
185(3)
Health-Related Fitness Testing Batteries for Adults
188(6)
ACSM Fitness Testing Battery
188(1)
YMCA Physical Fitness Test Battery
188(1)
Fitness Battery for Older Adults
188(6)
Testing Special Populations
194(1)
Measuring Physical Activity of Adults
194(6)
Summary
195(1)
Discussion Questions
195(1)
References
196(3)
Representative Readings
199(1)
Measuring Psychomotor Skills
200(72)
Stages of Movement Competencies
201(2)
Considerations for Testing
203(2)
Uses of Psychomotor Tests
205(2)
Testing Skill-Related Physical Fitness
207(17)
Components of Skill-Related Physical Fitness
208(1)
Measuring Agility
209(5)
Measuring Balance
214(2)
Measuring Coordination
216(3)
Measuring Power
219(2)
Measuring Speed and Reaction Time
221(3)
Test Batteries to Measure Basic Motor Abilities
224(7)
Test of Gross Motor Development---2
225(5)
North Carolina Motor Fitness Battery
230(1)
Texas Physical Motor Fitness/Developmental Tests
230(1)
Purdue Perceptual Motor Survey
231(1)
Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency
231(1)
The Basic Motor Ability Tests---Revised
231(1)
Test Batteries for Students with Disabilities
231(4)
Motor Fitness Testing for the Moderately Mentally Retarded
232(3)
Testing Specific Sports Skills
235(1)
Team Sports
236(17)
Measuring Basketball Skills
236(4)
Measuring Football Skills
240(3)
Measuring Soccer Skills
243(3)
Measuring Softball Skills
246(3)
Measuring Volleyball Skills
249(4)
Individual and Dual Sports
253(9)
Measuring Badminton Skills
253(3)
Measuring Golf Skills
256(2)
Measuring Racquetball Skills
258(1)
Measuring Tennis Skills
259(3)
Using Alternative Assessments
262(10)
Summary
264(1)
Discussion Questions
264(1)
References
265(3)
Representative Readings
268(4)
Measuring Cognitive Knowledge
272(29)
Measuring Cognitive Achievement
274(3)
School Settings
274(3)
Nonschool Settings
277(1)
Planning the Written Test
277(7)
Matching Test Items to Objectives
278(1)
Taxonomy of Educational Objectives
278(3)
Table of Specifications
281(3)
Selection of Test Items
284(7)
True/False
285(1)
Matching
285(1)
Multiple Choice
286(2)
Completion Items
288(1)
Short-Answer Questions
288(1)
Essay
288(3)
Administering the Written Test
291(2)
Assembling the Test
291(1)
Giving the Test
292(1)
Grading the Test
292(1)
Testing Students with Disabilities
292(1)
Analyzing the Test
293(4)
Quantitative Item Analysis
293(3)
Qualitative Item Analysis
296(1)
Using Alternative Assessments
297(4)
Sources for Test Questions
298(1)
Summary
299(1)
Discussion Questions
299(1)
References
300(1)
Representative Readings
300(1)
Measuring Affective Behaviors
301(35)
Data Gathering and Analysis
304(7)
Likert Scale
305(1)
The Two-Point Scale
306(1)
Semantic Differential Scale
307(1)
Uses of Attitudinal Scales
308(1)
Problems Associated with Attitudinal Testing
308(1)
Using Alternative Assessment Strategies
309(2)
Measuring Attitude toward Physical Activity
311(8)
Attitude toward Physical Activity
312(2)
Children's Attitude toward Physical Activity
314(1)
CSAPPA: Children's Self-perceptions of Adequacy in and Predilection for Physical Activity
315(2)
Feelings about Physical Activity Inventory
317(2)
Measuring Activity Interests of Participants
319(2)
Measuring Motivation
321(4)
Self-Motivation Inventory
321(2)
Physical Estimation and Attraction Scale
323(1)
Stages of Change Instrument
324(1)
Measuring Self-concept
325(6)
Cratty Adaptation of Piers-Harris Self-concept Scale
326(1)
Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory
327(2)
Physical Self-perception Profile
329(1)
The Physical Self-description Questionnaire
330(1)
Selected Social-Psychological Instruments
331(5)
Summary
332(1)
Discussion Questions
333(1)
References
333(2)
Representative Readings
335(1)
Grading
336(33)
Controversies of Grading
337(10)
To Grade or Not to Grade
337(2)
Issues in Grade Determination
339(8)
Methods of Grading
347(13)
Norm-Referenced Approach
347(6)
Criterion-Referenced Approach
353(2)
Other Methods of Determining Grades
355(5)
Reporting Student Performance Data
360(3)
Report Card
360(1)
Student Portfolios
361(1)
Personal Letter
361(1)
Conference
362(1)
Graphic Profile
362(1)
Grading Students with Disabilities
363(6)
The Written IEP Document
364(1)
Grading Alternative
365(1)
Summary
366(1)
Discussion Questions
367(1)
References
368(1)
Representative Readings
368(1)
Using Self-Evaluation to Improve Instruction
369(40)
Traditional Methods of Observation
371(3)
Eyeballing
372(1)
Note Taking
372(1)
Checklists
372(1)
Rating Scales
372(2)
Systematic Observation Methodology
374(1)
Data Recording Procedures
375(10)
Event Recording
376(3)
Interval Recording
379(3)
Duration Recording
382(3)
Validity and Reliability of Systematic Observation
385(3)
Validity
385(1)
Reliability
386(2)
Using Systematic Observation for Self-Evaluation
388(8)
Practice Time
389(1)
Instructional Time
389(1)
Management Time
390(1)
Response Latency
390(1)
Instructor Movement
390(2)
Specific Instructional Behaviors
392(4)
Selected Instruments for Systematic Observation
396(13)
All-purpose Event Recording Form (Instructor Behaviors)
396(2)
All-purpose Duration-Recording Form (Student Time Analysis)
398(1)
Group Time Sampling Form (Class Analysis)
398(2)
General Supervision Instrument
400(2)
System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time
402(2)
Behavioral Evaluation Strategy and Taxonomy
404(3)
Summary
407(1)
Discussion Questions
407(1)
References
407(2)
Measurement and Evaluation in Activity-Based Settings
409(34)
Measurement and Evaluation in School Settings
410(1)
Guidelines for Effective Measurement and Evaluation
410(1)
Blending Assessment into Instruction
411(2)
Variables Affecting Measurement and Evaluation Models
413(5)
Characteristics and Interests of Students
413(2)
Class Size
415(1)
Class Time
415(1)
Personnel Support
415(1)
Technological Support
416(1)
State and Local Mandates
416(1)
Curricular Content
416(2)
Examples of School Measurement and Evaluation Models
418(6)
Case Study #1---Elementary School Model
419(2)
Case Study #2---Middle School Model
421(1)
Case Study #3---High School Model
422(2)
Measurement and Evaluation for Students with Disabilities
424(5)
Measurement and Evaluation Models for Teaching Effectiveness
429(1)
Measurement and Evaluation in Nonschool Settings
430(1)
Considerations for Measurement and Evaluation in Nonschool Settings
431(4)
Program Goals
432(1)
Client Goals and Preferences
432(1)
Target Populations
432(1)
Risk Stratification
433(1)
Client Age
433(1)
Revenue Generation
433(1)
Equipment
433(1)
Support Personnel
434(1)
Time
434(1)
Monitoring Progres
434(1)
Measuring the Cognitive and Affective Domains
434(1)
Example of a Nonschool Measurement and Evaluation Model
435(8)
Week 1
436(1)
Week 2
437(1)
Weeks 6 through 10
437(1)
Ongoing Measurements
438(1)
Sample Case Study
438(2)
Summary
440(1)
Discussion Questions
440(1)
References
441(2)
Appendix 443(6)
Index 449


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