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Sports and Athletics in Higher Education,9781256379102
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Sports and Athletics in Higher Education

by ; ; ;
Edition:
1st
ISBN13:

9781256379102

ISBN10:
1256379107
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2012
Publisher(s):
Pearson Learning Solutions
List Price: $98.00

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Summary

Athletics on college campuses is not only one of the oldest traditions in higher education but also one of the oldest programs offered to students. The primary goal of this ASHE Reader is to provide a forum for discussion and analyses about the unique characteristics of sports and athletics participation in higher education. This reader will explore the needs, experiences and development of the American college student athlete and the political roles that sports and athletics play on college campuses. With a multidisciplinary approach, this reader examines the issues that face American college student athletes and sports in higher education by publishing the work and ideas of scholars and others interested in understanding the socio-political, historical, administrative, and developmental context of athletics in higher education and the administration of sports.

Table of Contents

 

FOREWORD THE RESEARCH CONTEXT OF COLLEGE SPORTS xii

BY JOHN R. THELIN

INTRODUCTION SPORTS AND STUDENT ATHLETES IN HIGHER EDUCATION xiv

BY JAMES SATTERFIELD

 

PART I HISTORY OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 1

CHAPTER 1

JOHN R. THELIN, “GOOD SPORTS? HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE POLITICAL 3

ECONOMY OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS IN THE ERA OF TITLE IX, 1972—1997”

CHAPTER 2

JAMES J. DUDERSTADT, “THE EVOLUTION OF COLLEGE SPORTS” 15

CHAPTER 3

RONALD A. SMITH, “THE FIRST INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORT: CREW 25

AND THE COMMERCIAL SPIRIT”

CHAPTER 4

JAMES L. SHULMAN ANDWILLIAM G. BOWEN, “THE INSTITUTIONALIZATION 33

AND REGULATION OF COLLEGE SPORTS IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE”

CHAPTER 5

RONALD D. FLOWERS, “WIN ONE FOR THE GIPPER” 55

CHAPTER 6

RONALD A. SMITH, “HARVARD AND COLUMBIAAND A RECONSIDERATION 67

OF THE 1905—06 FOOTBALL CRISIS”

 

PART II COMMERCIALIZATION OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 79

CHAPTER 7

DEREK BOK, “ATHLETICS” 81

CHAPTER 8

DAVID L. WESTBY AND ALLEN SACK, “THE COMMERCIALIZATION 91

AND FUNCTIONAL RATIONALIZATION OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL: ITS ORIGINS”

CHAPTER 9

JENNIFER L. CROISSANT, “CAN THIS CAMPUS BE BOUGHT? COMMERCIAL 107

INFLUENCE IN UNFAMILIAR PLACES”

CHAPTER 10

RONALD A. SMITH, “COMMERCIALIZED INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 113

AND THE 1903 HARVARD STADIUM”

CHAPTER 11

MURRAY SPERBER, “WHY THE NCAA CAN’T REFORM COLLEGE ATHLETICS” 123

CHAPTER 12

MURRAY SPERBER, “COLLEGE SPORTS INC: HOW BIG-TIME ATHLETIC 131

DEPARTMENTS RUN INTERFERENCE FOR COLLEGE, INC.”

 

PART III THE GOVERNANCE OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 141

CHAPTER 13

“AAUP STATEMENT ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS.” IN AAUP POLICY DOCUMENTS 143

AND REPORTS, 10TH ED.

CHAPTER 14

MYLES BRAND, “FACULTYMEMBERS’ CONSTRUCTIVE ENGAGEMENT IN 147

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS”

CHAPTER 15

JAMES J. DUDERSTADT, “INSTITUTIONAL CONTROL” 155

CHAPTER 16

JAMES H. FREY, “INSTITUTIONAL CONTROL OF ATHLETICS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE ROLE 169

PLAYED BY PRESIDENTS, FACULTY, TRUSTEES, ALUMNI, AND THE NCAA”

CHAPTER 17

JAMES J. DUDERSTADT, “THE GOVERNANCE OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS” 179

CHAPTER 18

J. DOUGLAS TOMA, “THE COLLEGIATE IDEAL AND THE TOOLS OF EXTERNAL RELATIONS: 191

THE USES OF HIGH- PROFILE INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS”

 

PART IV SPORTS AND THE LAW 199

CHAPTER 19

THOMAS J. ARKELL, “AGENT INTERFERENCE WITH COLLEGE ATHLETICS: WHAT 201

AGENTS CAN AND CANNOT DO ANDWHAT INSTITUTIONS SHOULD DO IN RESPONSE”

CHAPTER 20

TODD FISHER, “AMATEURISM AND INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS: 223

THE DOUBLE STANDARD OF SECTION 12.2.4.2.1”

CHAPTER 21

SARAH M. KONSKY, “AN ANTITRUST CHALLENGE TO THE NCCA TRANSFER RULES” 237

CHAPTER 22

HOWARD M. WASSERMAN, “CHEERS, PROFANITY, AND FREE SPEECH” 257

CHAPTER 23

JEFFREY HARRISON AND CASEY HARRISON, “THE LAWAND ECONOMICS 269

OF THE NCAA’S CLAIM TO MONOPSONY RIGHTS”

CHAPTER 24

JENNIFER L. HOFFMAN AND DAVID HORTON, JR., “STATE GENDER EQUITY 283

LAW & ATHLETIC PARTICIPATION AMONG COMMUNITY COLLEGES IN

WASHINGTON STATE”

 

PART V SOCIOLOGY OF SPORT 293

CHAPTER 25MARVINWASHINGTON, “DECLINING LEGITIMACY AND SOCIALMOBILITY: 295

A STUDY OFWHY COLLEGES LEFT THE NAIA FOR THE NCAA”

CHAPTER 26

ROBERT E. WASHINGTON AND DAVID KAREN, “SPORT AND SOCIETY” 309

CHAPTER 27

BLAKE GUMPRECHT, “THE AMERICAN COLLEGE TOWN” 329

CHAPTER 28

PIERRE BOURDIEU, “SPORT AND SOCIAL CLASS” 349

CHAPTER 29

JAMES W. SATTERFIELD AND MICHAEL G. GODFREY, “THE UNIVERSITY 359

OF NEBRASKA— LINCOLN FOOTBALL: A METAPHORICAL, SYMBOLIC AND

RITUALISTIC COMMUNITY EVENT”

CHAPTER 30

D. ERIC ARCHER, KERRI S. KEARNEY, AND BRENDA BLACKBURN, 373

“IMPACT OF TRANSITION FROM SPORT: THE EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCE

OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETES”

 

PART VI GENDER AND SPORTS 379

CHAPTER 31

“CHEERING ONWOMEN AND GIRLS IN SPORTS: USING TITLE IX TO FIGHT 381

GENDER ROLE OPPRESSION”

CHAPTER 32

A. PENT, H. GRAPPENDORF, AND A. HENDERSON, “DO THEYWANT MORE? 395

AN ANALYSIS OF NCAA SENIORWOMAN ADMINISTRATORS’ PARTICIPATION

IN FINANCIAL DECISION MAKING”

CHAPTER 33

BRANDON E. MARTIN AND FRANK HARRIS III, “EXAMINING PRODUCTIVE 407

CONCEPTIONS OF MASCULINITIES: LESSONS LEARNED FROM ACADEMICALLY

DRIVEN AFRICAN AMERICAN MALE STUDENT-ATHLETES”

CHAPTER 34

MICHELLE BEMILLER, “MENWHO CHEER” 421

CHAPTER 35

ANGELAHATTERY, EARL SMITH AND ELLEN STAUROWSKY, “THEY PLAY LIKE GIRLS: 437

GENDER EQUITY IN NCAA SPORTS”

CHAPTER 36

MARY HOWARD- HAMILTON, “AFRICAN- AMERICAN FEMALE ATHLETES: 453

ISSUES, IMPLICATIONS, AND IMPERATIVES FOR EDUCATORS”

PART VII RACE AND INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 459

CHAPTER 37

GEORGE B. CUNNINGHAM AND MICHAEL SAGAS, “ACCESS DISCRIMINATION 461

IN INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS”

CHAPTER 38

ROBIN L. HUGHES, JAMES W. SATTERFIELD, AND MARK S. GILES, “ATHLETISIZING BLACK 473

MALE STUDENT-ATHLETES: THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF RACE, SPORTS,

MYTHS AND REALITIES”

CHAPTER 39

CHARLES FRUEHLING SPRINGWOOD AND C. RICHARD KING, “‘PLAYING INDIAN’: 483

WHY NATIVE AMERICAN MASCOTS MUST END”

CHAPTER 40

HARRY EDWARDS, “THE BLACK ‘DUMB JOCK’: AN AMERICAN SPORTS TRAGEDY” 487

CHAPTER 41

KENNETH L. SHROPSHIRE, “THE ROOTS OF RACISM AND DISCRIMINATION IN SPORTS” 495

CHAPTER 42

DANA BROOKS, RONALD ALTHOUSE, AND DELANO TUCKER, “AFRICAN AMERICAN 503

MALE HEAD COACHES: IN THE ’RED ZONE,’ BUT CAN THEY SCORE?”

PART VIII STUDENT ATHLETES AND ACADEMICS 517

CHAPTER 43

PAUL D. UMBACH, MEGAN M. PALMER, GEORGE D. KUH, AND 519

STEPHANIE J. HANNAH, “INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETES AND EFFECTIVE

EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES: WINNING COMBINATION OR LOSING EFFORT?”

CHAPTER 44

EDDIE COMEAUX AND C. KEITH HARRISON, “FACULTY AND MALE STUDENT 537

ATHLETES: RACIAL DIFFERENCES IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL PREDICTORS

OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT”

CHAPTER 45

NCAA RESEARCH STAFF, TRENDS IN GRADUATION SUCCESS RATES 549

AND FEDERAL GRADUATION RATES AT NCAA DIVISION I INSTITUTIONS

CHAPTER 46

ERNEST T. PASCARELLA, RACHEL TRUCKENMILLER, AMAURY NORA, 567

PATRICK T. TERENZINI, MARCIA EDISON, AND LINDA SERRAHAGEDORN,

“COGNITIVE IMPACTS OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS PARTICIPATION:

SOME FURTHER EVIDENCE”

CHAPTER 47

ELIZABETH BROUGHTON AND MEGAN NEYER, “ADVISING AND COUNSELING 585

STUDENT ATHLETES”

CHAPTER 48

JOY GASTON GAYLES AND SHOUPING HU, “THE INFLUENCE OF STUDENT 591

ENGAGEMENT AND SPORT PARTICIPATION ON COLLEGE OUTCOMES AMONG

DIVISION I STUDENT ATHLETES”

 

PART IX REFORMING INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 605

CHAPTER 49DEREK BOK, “REFORMING ATHLETICS” 607

CHAPTER 50

JOHN R. THELIN, “THE REFORM CANON: THE 1929 CARNEGIE FOUNDATION 615

REPORT”

CHAPTER 51

ROBERT D. BENFORD, “THE COLLEGE SPORTS REFORM MOVEMENT: 629

REFRAMING THE ‘EDUTAINMENT’ INDUSTRY”

CHAPTER 52

JAMES J. DUDERSTADT, “ROADS TO REFORM” 649

CHAPTER 53

“THE FACULTY ROLE IN THE REFORM OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS: 665

PRINCIPLES AND RECOMMENDED PRACTICES”

CHAPTER 54

RAY YASSER, “A COMPREHENSIVE BLUEPRINT FOR THE REFORM 675

OF INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS”

 

PART X ADDITIONAL READINGS 699



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