9781568028187

American Foreign Policy Since World War II

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781568028187

  • ISBN10:

    1568028180

  • Edition: 16th
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2003-07-01
  • Publisher: Cq Pr

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Author Biography

Steven W. Hook is an associate professor at Kent State University John Spanier: is professor emeritus, he joined the faculty of the University of Florida, Gainesville, in 1957 and has lectured at the U.S. State Department's Foreign Service Institute, the Naval War College, military service academies, and several universities

Table of Contents

Maps and Featured Figures
xii
Preface xiii
The American Approach to Foreign Policy
1(23)
Learning from Experience
5(1)
The Volatile State System
6(5)
The Shifting Balance of Power
7(2)
The American Concept of Security
9(2)
The American National Style
11(8)
The American Sense of Destiny
11(2)
The Depreciation of Power in International Politics
13(4)
The Penchant for Crusading
17(2)
Self-Doubts and Revisionist Histories
19(5)
From World War to Cold War
24(26)
American Wartime Illusions
25(4)
The Russo-Soviet Approach to Foreign Policy
29(3)
The Russian Background
29(1)
The Soviet Ingredient
30(2)
Soviet Expansion after World War II
32(6)
U.S.-Soviet Differences
34(2)
The Soviet Push to the South
36(2)
Toward the Strategy of Containment
38(8)
George Kennan and the New Grand Strategy
40(3)
Alternatives to Containment
43(2)
The Changing of the Guard: Sea Power versus Land Power
45(1)
Declaring Cold War: The Truman Doctrine
46(4)
Containment: From Theory to Practice
50(31)
New Economic and Military Structures
52(3)
The Bretton Woods System
52(2)
The National Security Act
54(1)
Reviving the Western European Allies
55(9)
The Marshall Plan
57(1)
Roots of the European Union
58(2)
Military Rearmament and the NATO Alliance
60(2)
Recurring Conflicts over Berlin
62(2)
Confronting Revolution in East Asia
64(9)
The Chinese Revolution
64(2)
Hot War in Korea
66(6)
Conflict in the Taiwan Straits
72(1)
Domestic Pressures for a Global Crusade
73(2)
Nuclear Strategy and the ``Balance of Terror''
75(6)
Developing Countries in the Crossfire
81(31)
Obstacles to Political and Economic Development
84(8)
The Population Explosion in Developing Countries
85(1)
Financial Obstacles to Development
86(1)
Tensions between Nationalism and State Building
87(3)
The Revolution of Rising Expectations
90(2)
Clashing Models of Economic Development
92(4)
Regional Conflicts in Africa and the Middle East
96(5)
National Disintegration and Civil War in the Congo
96(2)
Regional Rivalries: The Arab-Israeli Wars
98(3)
U.S. Policy toward Latin America
101(3)
Superpower Confrontation in Cuba
104(8)
The Bay of Pigs
107(1)
The Cuban Missile Crisis
108(4)
Vietnam and the Cost of Containment
112(26)
Ejection of the French from Vietnam
113(3)
The ``Domino Theory'' and U.S. Intervention
116(4)
The Perils of Incrementalism
120(2)
The Misconduct of Guerrilla Warfare
122(9)
The Military Battlefield: Vietnam
125(3)
The Political Battlefield: The United States
128(3)
Disengagement from Vietnam
131(3)
Congress versus the ``Imperial Presidency''
134(4)
The Era of Superpower Detente
138(24)
Managing the Superpower Rivalry
141(9)
The Kissinger Philosophy
142(3)
Exploiting the Sino-Soviet Split
145(3)
Linking Cooperation to Soviet Restraint
148(2)
Arms Control as the Centerpiece of Detente
150(3)
The Erosion of U.S. Alliances
153(1)
New Military Flashpoints
154(5)
Chile's Military Takeover
155(2)
Regional Conflicts in Africa
157(2)
Disillusionment with Detente
159(3)
Jimmy Carter and World-Order Politics
162(24)
Recognizing Global Interdependence
164(3)
A Focus on North-South Relations
167(5)
The New International Economic Order
168(1)
The Foreign Aid ``Regime''
169(2)
OPEC's Economic Challenge
171(1)
Carter's Middle East Breakthrough
172(5)
The Collapse of Carter's Foreign Policy
177(7)
The Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan
178(1)
Revolution and Communist Rule in Nicaragua
179(2)
America ``Held Hostage'' in Iran
181(3)
Lessons of World-Order Politics
184(2)
The Revival of Superpower Confrontation
186(28)
Reagan's Rhetorical Offensive
188(2)
Expanding U.S. Military Forces
190(4)
Opposition to Arms Control
191(2)
The Strategic Defense Initiative
193(1)
``Rollback'' in Developing Countries
194(10)
Evaluating the Reagan Doctrine
199(3)
Abuses of the Reagan Doctrine: The Iran-contra Scandal
202(2)
Alliance Politics in the Late Cold War
204(6)
Poland and the Rise of Solidarity
205(2)
The Missile Debate in Europe
207(1)
NATO Threatened from Within
208(2)
From Confrontation to Conciliation
210(4)
The End of the Cold War
214(27)
Bush's Management of the Soviet Collapse
215(12)
Dismantling Stalin's Empire
217(6)
Detaching Brezhnev's Outposts
223(2)
Reducing Arms and Stabilizing the Nuclear Balance
225(2)
Endgame: The Collapse of the Core
227(5)
Reasons for the Soviet Collapse
232(7)
The Contending Arguments in Perspective
233(5)
Excesses of the Containment Policy
238(1)
A Final Appraisal
239(2)
America's ``Unipolar Moment''
241(27)
Great Expectations after the Cold War
244(2)
Revived Debates about America's World Role
246(5)
Clinton's Embrace of ``Geoeconomics''
251(9)
The Course of America's Economic Troubles
252(3)
Responses by the Clinton Administration
255(2)
East Asia's Economic ``Miracle''
257(3)
Promoting Democracy and Sustainable Development
260(4)
A Grand Strategy of Democratic ``Enlargement''
260(2)
Support for Sustainable Development
262(2)
Domestic Challenges to Clinton's Foreign Policy
264(4)
Old Tensions in a New Order
268(27)
Sources of Global Fragmentation
269(2)
War and Peace in the Middle East
271(11)
Iraq's Challenge in the Persian Gulf
271(8)
Obstacles to an Arab-Israeli Peace
279(3)
The Plight of ``Failed States''
282(7)
Somalia and Central Africa
284(3)
Haiti
287(2)
Nuclear Brinkmanship in South Asia
289(3)
Lessons from the Regional Crises
292(3)
The Shifting European Landscape
295(29)
Western Europe: From Community to Union
297(3)
Jump-Starting Democracy in Eastern Europe
300(3)
NATO's Endurance after the Cold War
303(3)
``Ethnic Cleansing'' in the Balkans
306(10)
The Dayton Accords
310(2)
The Kosovo Showdown
312(4)
U.S.-Russian Relations under Stress
316(8)
Internal Challenges to Reform
317(3)
Unrest in the ``Near Abroad''
320(4)
America under Fire
324(28)
Strains in the Unipolar Order
326(6)
The Globalization Backlash
327(2)
U.S. Opposition to International Agreements
329(3)
Terror in the Morning Sky
332(2)
Waging War against Terrorism
334(13)
The al Qaeda Connection
336(4)
Elements of Asymmetric Warfare
340(1)
Intelligence
341(1)
Diplomacy
342(1)
Homeland Security
342(1)
The Afghanistan Campaign
343(3)
Outbreak of Domestic Terrorism
346(1)
A Grand Strategy of Primacy and Preemption
347(5)
A World of Trouble
352(26)
An Economic Boom Gone Bust
354(6)
East Asia's Reversal of Fortune
355(3)
Challenges to the ``Washington Consensus''
358(2)
Renewed Hostilities against Iraq
360(10)
Building Support for Action
363(1)
Diplomatic Ruptures and Allied Resistance
364(6)
North Korea's Nuclear Breakout
370(2)
Global Orders and American Power
372(6)
Appendix A: U.S. Administrations since World War II 378(1)
Appendix B: Chronology of Significant Events 379(15)
Select Bibliography 394(13)
Select Web Sites 407(2)
Index 409(22)
Photo Credits 431

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