9780803972155

Communicating Social Science Research to Policy Ma

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780803972155

  • ISBN10:

    0803972156

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1998-11-12
  • Publisher: Sage Publications
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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

Using a set of rules as a guide for cost-effective policy analysis, Communicating Social Science Research to Policy Makers helps applied researchers avoid costly mistakes in policy planning and public administration research. Beginning with a practical approach to policy analysis, authors Roger J. Vaughan and Terry F. Buss show the reader how to prepare a nonbiased description of the problem to be studied, how to diagnose the causes of the problem, how to explore the various strategies for dealing with the problem and related issues, how to use formal forecasting projections, how to do cost-benefits analysis, how an analyst can decide what information to communicate, and strategies for the most-effective communication of policy analysis.

Table of Contents

Preface ix(4)
Acknowledgments xiii
1. Offering Advice
1(13)
Rule 1: Know the Limits of Social Science
2(3)
Rule 2: Be Practical
5(8)
Cost-Benefit Analysis and Policy Analysis
6(1)
Policy Analysis and Medicine Compared
7(6)
Summary
13(1)
2. Assessing
14(16)
Rule 1: Maintain an Open Mind
15(4)
Rule 2: Look Behind the Numbers
19(6)
Rule 3: Learn the History of the Issue
25(2)
Summary
27(1)
Case Studies
27(3)
3. Diagnosing
30(15)
Rule 1: Develop Competing Hypotheses
32(1)
Rule 2: Determine Whether the Problem Is Caused by Private Actions
33(5)
Systemic Problems Arising From Private Actions
34(2)
Nonsystemic Problems Arising From Private Actions
36(2)
Rule 3: Determine Whether the Problem Is Caused by Government Intervention
38(2)
Systemic Problems Resulting From Public Actions
38(1)
Nonsystemic Problems Resulting From Public Actions
39(1)
Rule 4: Analyze Hypotheses
40(1)
Rule 5: Follow Up on the Diagnosis
41(1)
Summary
42(1)
Case Study
42(3)
4. Prescribing
45(30)
Rule 1: Select the Appropriate Baseline for Decision Making
48(2)
Rule 2: Assign Priorities
50(1)
Rule 3: Weigh Relative Risks
51(1)
Rule 4: Create a Diversified Policy Portfolio
52(1)
Rule 5: Define Options Clearly
52(1)
Rule 6: Examine Today's Actions Against Tomorrow's Options
53(1)
Rule 7: Know the Policy Timetable
54(2)
Rule 8: Know the Players
56(1)
Rule 9: Know the Policy Vocabulary
57(1)
Rule 10: Consider Placebos
58(1)
Rule 11: Measure Options in Terms of Opportunities
58(1)
Rule 12: Avoid Common Pitfalls
59(5)
Rule 13: Compare Options
64(2)
Net Present Value
65(1)
Internal Rate of Return
65(1)
Discounting the Future
65(1)
Discounting for Risk
66(1)
Rule 14: Focus on Outcomes, Not Process
66(1)
Rule 15: Consider Starting Over
67(1)
Rule 16: Know When to Give Up
67(1)
Rule 17: Develop a Communications Strategy for the Policy
68(1)
Summary
69(1)
Case Studies
70(5)
Case Study 1. Youth Unemployment
70(2)
Case Study 2. Building a Highway Link
72(3)
5. Prognosticating
75(17)
Why Forecast?
76(2)
Who Should Forecast?
78(1)
What Forecasting Techniques Are Available and Work Best?
79(2)
Judgment
81(3)
How Accurate Are Forecasts?
84(1)
Rule 1: Garbage In Yields Garbage Out
85(1)
Rule 2: Use Multiple Techniques to Forecast, Then Look for Convergence
85(1)
Rule 3: When Forecasts Diverge, Consider Averaging Them
86(1)
Rule 4: Look for Turning Points
87(1)
Rule 5: Monitor Forecasts Using Prospective Data
88(1)
Summary
88(1)
Case Study
89(3)
6. Evaluating
92(15)
Rule 1: Measure Program Performance
93(2)
Rule 2: State Program Goals Clearly
95(1)
Rule 3: Develop Yardsticks for Measuring Progress
96(2)
Rule 4: Create Incentives for Good Performance
98(1)
Rule 5: Anticipate Opposition
99(4)
Rule 6: Evaluate the Evaluators
103(1)
Summary
104(1)
Case Studies
104(3)
Case 1. Measuring Policy Outcomes in Oregon and Minnesota
104(1)
Case 2. Florida's Policy Accountability System
105(2)
7. Figuring Out What to Say
107(15)
Rule 1: Analyze Policy, Not Politics
108(1)
Rule 2: Keep It Simple
109(3)
Rule 3: Communicate Reasoning as Well as Bottom Lines
112(2)
Rule 4: Use Numbers Sparingly
114(1)
Rule 5: Elucidate, Don't Advocate
115(1)
Rule 6: Identify Winners and Losers
116(2)
Rule 7: Don't Overlook Unintended Consequences
118(3)
Summary
121(1)
8. Deciding How to Say It
122(22)
Rule 1: Write to Think
124(1)
Rule 2: Don't Fear First Drafts
124(3)
Rule 3: Show, Don't Tell
127(4)
Rule 4: Be Brief and Clear
131(2)
Rule 5: Build the Story With Paragraphs
133(2)
Rule 6: Write Clear Sentences
135(3)
Rule 7: Omit Needless Words
138(2)
Rule 8: Avoid Jargon
140(3)
Afterword
143(1)
Summary
143(1)
References 144(7)
Index 151(8)
About the Authors 159

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