9780073100074

Digital Radio Production with Free Student CD-ROMs and Online Learning Center

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780073100074

  • ISBN10:

    0073100072

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2004-11-29
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

In a field overrun with outdated texts,Digital Radio Productionoffers a refreshing and much needed alternative: It is the only text on the market to illuminate the world of radio as it exists in the 21st century, and to explore where radio is headed tomorrow--including an introduction to high definition radio, the next major radio transmission format.Written by an author with over 20 years of industry experience, the text speaks clearly to young people about practical realities (such as pursuing a first job in radio and creating an audition CD), while giving them solid production knowledge as well as realistic impression of the industry they may be considering for a career.

Table of Contents

Preface xix
Scope and Focus xix
Structure xx
CDs and Supplements Package xxi
Acknowledgments xxii
About the Author xxv
The Production Person
1(22)
Introduction
2(2)
The Radio Station as a Business: The Profit Perspective
2(2)
Radio Broadcasting Revenues
4(1)
The Role of the Radio Production Person
4(4)
What Makes a Good Production Person?
6(2)
The Radio Station as an Organization
8(10)
The Business Side
8(3)
The Programming Side
11(7)
The Radio Team in Action
18(2)
From a Budget to a Commercial
19(1)
Suggested Activities
20(1)
Web Sites for More Information
20(1)
Pro Speak
20(3)
Basic Science: Analog and Digital Audio
23(22)
It's an Analog World
24(12)
The Beginnings of Sound
24(10)
Your Ears: How They Work and How to Take Care of Them
34(2)
To Answer the Age-Old Question
36(1)
It's a Digital World
36(6)
The Foundation of Digital Audio
37(1)
Analog-to-Digital Conversion
37(3)
Practical Uses of Digital Audio
40(2)
Suggested Activities
42(1)
Web Sites for More Information
42(1)
Pro Speak
42(3)
Microphones and Their Role in Radio Production
45(48)
Microphones as Transducers
46(1)
Dynamic Microphones
46(4)
Dynamic Microphones
46(2)
Ribbon Microphones
48(2)
Electrostatic Microphones
50(4)
Condenser Microphones
50(3)
Digital Condenser Microphones
53(1)
Microphone Pickup or Directional Patterns
54(6)
The Five Basic Microphone Directional Patterns
55(3)
Multipattern Microphones
58(1)
Stereo Microphones
59(1)
Factors to Consider in Selecting a Microphone
60(3)
Frequency Response
60(2)
Sensitivity
62(1)
Overload and Maximum Sound-Pressure Level
62(1)
Gain Staging
63(1)
Microphone Mounts
64(4)
People
64(1)
Floor Stands
64(1)
Floor Booms
65(1)
Desk Stands
65(1)
Desk-Mounted Microphone Arms
65(1)
Clips, Clamps, and Goosenecks
66(2)
Shock Mounts
68(1)
Why You Need a Shock Mount
69(1)
Microphone Placement
69(6)
Microphone Myths and the Science behind Microphone Placement
69(1)
Basic Microphone Placement Guidelines
70(1)
Stereo Microphone Placement Guidelines
71(4)
Windscreens and Pop Filters
75(2)
Pop Filters
75(1)
Windscreens
76(1)
Microphone Cables
77(2)
Balanced Cables
77(1)
Unbalanced Cables
78(1)
Microphone Connectors
79(2)
XLR ``Cannon'' Connectors
79(1)
Quarter-Inch Connectors
80(1)
Mini-TRS and T/S Connectors
80(1)
Microphone Cable Care
80(1)
Microphone Preamplifiers
81(2)
Boosting Microphone Signals
81(2)
Selecting a Microphone Preamplifier
83(1)
Special-Purpose Microphones
83(2)
Lavalier or Body Microphones
83(1)
Shotgun Microphones
84(1)
Headset Microphones
84(1)
Wireless Microphones
85(1)
Transmitters
85(1)
Wireless Receivers
86(1)
Making the Final Selection
86(1)
Suggested Activities
87(1)
Web Sites for More Information
88(1)
Pro Speak
88(5)
Control, Mixing, and Monitoring
93(34)
Operational Theory
94(1)
Understanding the Different Sections of a Console
94(1)
Types of Audio Control Consoles
95(1)
On-Air and Production Consoles
95(2)
On-Air Console Overview
95(1)
Production Console Overview
95(1)
The Impact of Digital Consoles
95(2)
On-Air Consoles in Depth
97(5)
Selecting the Channel Input
97(1)
The Output or Assignment Section
97(2)
Listening in Cue
99(1)
Faders and Level Control
99(1)
Monitoring Your Work
100(1)
On-Air Operational Tips
100(2)
Production Consoles in Depth
102(11)
The In-Line Layout
103(2)
The Input Section
105(1)
Channel Assignment and Routing
106(1)
Controlling Audio Levels
106(1)
Panoramic Control
107(1)
Shaping the Sound: Equalization
107(1)
Audio Filtering
107(1)
Auxiliary Sends and Returns: Connecting Outboard Gear
108(1)
Metering: Being Able to See Audio
108(2)
Hearing Your Work: The Monitor Section
110(1)
The Master Section: Controlling the Final Console Output
111(1)
Console Automation
112(1)
Virtual Control Consoles
113(1)
Portable Mixers
114(3)
Overview
114(1)
The Portable-Mixer Input Stage
115(1)
The Portable-Mixer Output Stage
116(1)
Additional Features on Portable Mixers
116(1)
The Portable Mixer Monitoring Stage
117(1)
Monitors
117(7)
Monitor Speakers
117(1)
How Monitor Speakers Work
118(2)
Woofers and Tweeters
120(2)
Self-Powered Monitor Speakers
122(1)
Monitor Speaker Placement and Stereo Imaging
122(2)
Suggested Activities
124(1)
Web Sites for More Information
124(1)
Pro Speak
124(3)
Basic Concepts in Digital Recording
127(48)
Recording in the Digital Domain
128(4)
Recording
128(1)
Editing
129(1)
Mixing
129(2)
Mastering
131(1)
Digital Audio Workstations: Using a Computer as a Recorder
132(23)
Computer-Based Hybrid Devices
134(1)
Digital Audio Workstation Software
134(2)
Adobe Audition
136(1)
Producing a Project with Adobe Audition
137(6)
Pro Tools
143(2)
Producing a Project with Pro Tools
145(9)
Portable Digital Audio Recording
154(1)
Project Backup and Storage
155(4)
Backup
155(3)
Project Storage
158(1)
The Digital Recording Process
159(5)
Digital Inputs and Outputs
159(2)
Digital Audio Interconnection
161(1)
Digital Sample Rates and Clock Synchronization
162(2)
Digital Recording Media
164(8)
Magnetic Tape
164(2)
Magnetic Hard Drives and Solid-State Memory
166(2)
Optical Discs
168(3)
Magneto-Optical Discs
171(1)
Suggested Activities
172(1)
Web Sites for More Information
173(1)
Pro Speak
173(2)
Audio Processing
175(24)
An Introduction to Audio Processing
176(1)
Dynamics Processing
176(6)
Compression
177(2)
Limiting
179(1)
Expansion
179(1)
Gating
180(2)
Frequency Equalization
182(4)
Graphic EQ
183(1)
Parametric EQ
184(1)
Filters
184(1)
De-essing
185(1)
Guidelines for Using EQ
186(1)
Dimension
186(4)
Echo, Slap Delay, and Doubling
187(1)
Reverberation
188(1)
Chorus, Phase Shifting, and Flanging
189(1)
Re-amping
190(1)
Broadcast Audio Delay
190(1)
Normalizing
190(1)
Voice Processors
191(3)
Basic Voice Processor Adjustments
193(1)
Effects Processors
194(1)
Broadcast Audio Processing
194(2)
Webcast Audio Processing
196(1)
Suggested Activities
196(1)
Web Sites for More Information
197(1)
Pro Speak
197(2)
The Art of Sixty-Second Story Telling
199(16)
Production as a Part of the Sales Process
200(3)
Why Advertising Works
201(1)
AIDA, an Opera about Success
201(1)
What's In It For Me? (WIFM)
202(1)
The Salesperson/Client Relationship
202(1)
Turning a Sales Order into a Working Commercial
203(10)
Why You Need to Create Great Commercials
203(2)
Brainstorming
205(1)
Refinement
205(1)
Selecting a Style
205(2)
Putting Words to Paper
207(6)
Record-Keeping and Archiving
213(1)
Suggested Activities
214(1)
Web Sites for More Information
214(1)
Pro Speak
214(1)
Producing Commercials, Promos, and News
215(26)
Talent
216(1)
Production Pre-Planning
217(7)
Script
217(1)
Technical Considerations and Track Layout
217(1)
Music Selection
218(3)
Sound Effects Selection
221(1)
Talent Selection
222(2)
Scheduling Studio Time
224(1)
Production
224(12)
Recording
224(2)
Editing
226(5)
Mixing and Processing
231(2)
Agency- and Manufacturer-Supplied Commercial Material
233(1)
Client Approval
234(1)
Preparing the Commercial to Go On-Air
234(1)
Preparing the Commercial Archive: Backup
235(1)
Duplication for Other Stations
235(1)
Documentation
235(1)
News Production
236(2)
Newscasts
236(2)
Long-Form Programming
238(1)
Suggested Activities
238(1)
Web Sites for More Information
239(1)
Pro Speak
239(2)
Communicating with the Listener: Announcing
241(24)
Communicating On-Air
242(10)
Pre-Planning Your Show
242(2)
Live Delivery
244(4)
Voice-Tracking Delivery
248(1)
News Delivery
249(2)
Sports Delivery
251(1)
Working with Producers and Production Directors
252(1)
An Announcer's Basic Tools of Communication
253(10)
Your Voice
253(1)
Developing Your Voice
253(2)
Basic Communication Skills
255(3)
Basic Communication Tools
258(5)
Your Personality
263(1)
Suggested Activities
263(1)
Web Sites for More Information
264(1)
Pro Speak
264(1)
Promotion and Station Imaging
265(16)
Station Promotion
266(6)
The Purpose of Promotion
266(3)
Program Promotion
269(2)
The Bad Promo: A Dangerous Situation
271(1)
Station Imaging
272(4)
The Purpose of Station Imaging
272(1)
The Promotional Voice
272(2)
Liners
274(1)
Sweepers
274(1)
Station Identification: The Legal ID
275(1)
Jingles
275(1)
Image Placement
276(1)
Contest Promotion
276(3)
The Great Tease: Getting the Listener Interested
277(1)
Contest Promos
278(1)
Contest Post-Promotion
278(1)
Legal Requirements of Contest Promotion
279(1)
Suggested Activities
279(1)
Web Sites for More Information
280(1)
Pro Speak
280(1)
Fieldwork: Taking the Station on Location
281(24)
Location Planning
282(3)
Promotion and Sales Location Planning
282(1)
News and Sports Location Planning
283(2)
Remote Broadcast Transmission Methods
285(10)
Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS)
286(1)
Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) Codecs
286(4)
ISDN Codecs
290(1)
Which Is Best, POTS or ISDN?
290(1)
Remote-Pickup Units (Transmitters)
291(2)
Satellite Telephone Service
293(2)
Producing Audio for Radio Remotes
295(7)
Commercial Remotes
295(2)
Sports Remotes
297(2)
News and Special-Event Coverage
299(3)
Suggested Activities
302(1)
Web Sites for More Information
302(1)
Pro Speak
302(3)
Interfacing with the Net
305(16)
Background
306(1)
The Challenge of Competing with Another Medium
306(1)
Why Radio Needs the Internet
306(1)
How Radio Uses the Internet
307(5)
Linking Two Dissimilar Media
307(1)
Programming a Web Site
308(1)
Web Words: A New Vocabulary
308(2)
Web Site Content
310(2)
Technical and Economic Considerations
312(1)
Audio Production for the Internet
312(2)
Streaming Audio
312(1)
Audio Clips
313(1)
Webcasting
314(4)
Respecting the Music
314(1)
Audio Transmission Formats
315(3)
Suggested Activities
318(1)
Web Sites for More Information
319(1)
Pro Speak
319(2)
From Here to There: Radio and Audio Transmission in a Digital World
321(22)
Internet Audio Transmission for Commercial and Production Transfer
322(4)
Internet Connection Speeds
322(1)
Local Area Network (LAN)
323(1)
Wide Area Network (WAN)
323(1)
Internet File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
323(2)
MP3 and MP2 File Transfer
325(1)
ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network)
326(2)
The ISDN Transmission System
326(1)
Benefits of ISDN
327(1)
HD Radio: AM and FM In-Band-On-Channel (IBOC) Digital Transmission
328(2)
The HD Radio Transmission System
328(1)
HD Radio System Benefits
329(1)
Software-Defined Radios
329(1)
HD Radio Production, a New Dimension
330(1)
The Challenges of HD Radio Production
330(1)
Mixing Production in 5.1 Surround Sound
330(1)
Digital Satellite Radio Services
331(2)
The Digital Satellite Radio Transmission System
331(2)
Competitive Benefits of Digital Satellite Radio
333(1)
Analog Radio Transmission Methods
333(7)
AM Transmission
334(3)
FM Transmission
337(3)
Suggested Activities
340(1)
Web Sites for More Information
341(1)
Pro Speak
341(2)
Programming, Production, and Measuring Success
343(26)
Arbitron Audience Ratings
345(2)
Average Quarter-Hour
345(2)
Cume
347(1)
Time Spent Listening
347(1)
Music and Format Selection
347(6)
Researching a Market
349(2)
In-Depth Format Analysis
351(1)
Selling the Target Demographic
351(2)
Strategy and Tactics
353(1)
The Program Director's Duties
353(5)
Music Mix and Rotation
354(1)
Program Elements
354(1)
Selecting a Promotional Voice
354(2)
Formatics and Inventory Control
356(1)
Comparison-Shopping a Format
357(1)
Coordinating All of the Program Elements
358(1)
Format Delivery
358(9)
Live Radio
358(1)
Live-Assist Radio
359(1)
Automated Radio
360(3)
Syndicated Radio
363(2)
The Format-Delivery Decision
365(1)
The Production Person's Role in Programming
366(1)
Suggested Activities
367(1)
Web Sites for More Information
367(1)
Pro Speak
367(2)
Getting Your First Job in Radio
369
Internship: Getting the Jump on the Competition
370(8)
The Planning Process
371(1)
Selecting a Station
372(1)
Asking for an Internship
372(2)
How to Gain More from Your Internship
374(4)
Resume
378(9)
Formatting Your Resume
379(1)
Targeting Your Resume
379(2)
Resume Contents
381(6)
Audition CD
387(2)
Packaging Your Application
389(2)
The Creative Approach to Package Delivery
389(2)
The Electronic Resume and Audition
391(1)
Tracking an Application's Progress
391(1)
Suggested Activities
392(1)
Web Sites for More Information
392
Appendix
1(1)
Digital Radio Production Demonstration CD
1(3)
Digital Radio Production Music CD
4
Glossary 1(1)
Annotated Bibliography 1(1)
Adobe Audition License 1(1)
Index 1

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