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9780834220836

The Effective Health Care Supervisor

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780834220836

  • ISBN10:

    0834220830

  • Edition: 5th
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2002-01-01
  • Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Pub
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Summary

Text, for students and professionals, includes practical applications of management principles in the healthcare setting. New and revised sections cover managed care, time and stress management, coaching, sexual harassment, motivating employees, ethics, teams and teamwork, and coping with responsibilities. Previous edition: c1997. Softcover. DNLM: Personnel Admin.

Author Biography

Charles R. McConnell retired following 18 years in health care human resource management with the affiliated organizations of ViaHealth, Rochester, New York; 11 years as a senior consultant with the Management and Planning Services (MAPS) division of the Hospital Association of New York State; and a prior career in industrial engineering

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
PART I---THE SETTING 1(60)
An Evolving Role in a Changing Environment
3(18)
Situation: Reinventing the Health Care Organization
3(1)
The (Whirl)Winds of Change
4(1)
The Broadest Shifting Paradigms: A Whole New Environment
4(1)
Organizational Priority One: The Bottom Line
5(1)
Then Came Reengineering
6(1)
Can We ``Reinvent'' the Hospital?
7(1)
The Managed Care ``Solution''
7(3)
The Balanced Budget Act of 1997
10(1)
Health Care Paradigms and Their Effects
11(1)
Marketing Health Care
12(1)
The Evolving Role of the Health Care Manager
13(6)
Job Security in the New Environment
19(2)
Health Care: How Different from ``Industry''?
21(14)
Situation: The Case of the Stubborn Employee, or ``It Isn't in the Job Description''
21(1)
Process versus Environment
22(3)
Identifying the Real Differences
25(2)
Health Care Settings
27(1)
Implications for Management
28(2)
Returning to ``The Stubborn Employee''
30(1)
A Word about Quality
31(1)
External Pressure: An Area of Increasing Concern
31(2)
Your Supervisory Approach
33(2)
The Nature of Supervision: Health Care and Everywhere
35(10)
Situation: Paid To Make Decisions?
35(1)
Born To Work or Watch?
36(1)
The Supervisor's Two Hats
37(1)
The Peter Principle Revisited
38(1)
The Working Trap
39(1)
Nothing To Do?
40(1)
The Responsibilities of Health Care Management
41(1)
The Nature of Supervision
42(1)
Truly Paid To Make Decisions?
43(2)
Management and Its Basic Functions
45(16)
Situation: A Tough Day for the New Manager
45(1)
Definitions, Titles, and Other Intangibles
46(4)
Introducing the Management Functions
50(1)
Management Functions in Brief
51(1)
Planning
52(2)
Organizing
54(1)
Directing
55(1)
Coordinating
56(1)
Controlling
56(1)
The Management Functions in Action
56(1)
Emphasis
57(1)
Processes versus People
58(3)
PART II---THE SUPERVISOR AND SELF 61(56)
Delegation and Empowerment: Forming Some Good Habits
63(21)
Situation: Delegation for the Wrong Reasons, or ``If You Want Something Done Right...''
63(1)
Taken for Granted
64(1)
The Nature of Delegation
65(1)
What about ``Empowerment''?
66(1)
Why Delegate?
67(2)
Failure To Delegate
69(2)
Looking Upward as Well as Downward: The Personal Approach to Delegation
71(4)
The Pattern: The Nuts and Bolts of Delegation
75(4)
''If You Want Something Done Right...``
79(1)
Authority and Responsibility
80(1)
Freedom To Fail
81(1)
Building the Habit
81(3)
Time Management: Expanding the Day without Stretching the Clock
84(14)
Situation: The Manager and the Sales Representative
84(1)
Time and Time Again
84(1)
The Time Wasters
85(3)
The Time Savers
88(6)
Time Management and Stress Management: Inseparable Activities
94(1)
Time-Wasting Pressures and the Supervisor's Response
95(1)
The Unrenewable Resource
96(2)
Self-Management and Personal Supervisory Effectiveness
98(19)
Situation: The Case of the Vanishing Day
98(1)
It Starts with You
99(1)
Initiative
100(1)
Barriers to Effectiveness
101(1)
Organization
101(2)
Individual Planning and Goal Setting
103(2)
Stress and the Supervisor
105(3)
Effective Use of Time
108(1)
How Well Are You Suited to the Supervisory Role?
108(9)
PART III---THE SUPERVISOR AND THE EMPLOYEE 117(122)
Interviewing: Start Strong To Recruit Successfully
119(16)
Exercise: Potential Interview Questions?
119(1)
The Manager and the Interview
120(1)
Candidates: Outside and Inside
121(1)
Preparing for the Interview
122(2)
Guidelines for Questioning
124(6)
The Actual Interview
130(2)
Follow-up
132(3)
The One-to-One Relationship
135(14)
Situation: The Case of the Employee Who Is ``Never Wrong''
135(1)
The Transfer of Meaning
136(2)
The Two-Way Street
138(1)
Barriers to Effective Communication
139(2)
Is Anyone Really ''Never Wrong``?
141(1)
Listening
142(1)
Diversity in the One-to-One Relationship
143(2)
Some Guidelines for Effective Interpersonal Communication
145(1)
The Open-Door Attitude
146(3)
Leadership: Style and Substance
149(13)
Situation: One Boss Too Many
149(1)
Introducing Leadership
150(1)
Patterns of Leadership
150(2)
Some Assumptions about People
152(1)
Style and Circumstances
153(1)
Outmoded Views
154(1)
Leadership's Primary Characteristic
154(1)
Word Play: Leadership versus ``Management''
155(1)
Can You Lead ``by the Book''?
156(1)
An Employee's View
157(1)
The Visible Supervisor
158(1)
Leading by Default
158(1)
True Leadership
159(1)
Return to: ``One Boss Too Many''
159(3)
Motivation: Intangible Forces and Slippery Rules
162(12)
Situation: Always the Last To Know
162(1)
Satisfaction in Work
163(1)
Demands on the Organization
164(1)
Motivating Forces: The Basic Needs
164(4)
What Makes Them Perform?
168(1)
Money as a Motivator
169(1)
Learn What Motivates Your Employees: Look to Yourself
169(2)
Why the Last To Know?
171(1)
Motivation and the First-Line Manager
172(2)
Performance Appraisal: Cornerstone of Employee Development
174(22)
Situation: ``It's Review Time Again''
174(1)
Appraisal and the Manager
175(1)
The Objectives of Appraisal
176(1)
Traditional Appraisal Methods
177(5)
Common Appraisal Problems
182(1)
Why Appraisal Programs Often Fail
183(1)
What about Jack's Evaluation?
184(1)
Why Appraise at All?
185(1)
Requirements of an Effective Appraisal System
185(2)
The Changing Language of Appraisal
187(1)
Making Performance Appraisal Legally Defensible
188(1)
Standard-Based Appraisal: A Long-Range Target
189(1)
Constructive Appraisal
190(2)
The Appraisal Interview
192(1)
Living with an Existing System
193(1)
A Simple Objective
194(2)
Criticism and Discipline: Guts, Tact, and Justice
196(13)
Situation: Did He Have It Coming?
196(1)
The Need for Rules
197(1)
Criticism
197(4)
Discipline
201(5)
Coaching: Stopping Trouble before It Starts
206(1)
Guts, Tact, and Justice
207(2)
The Problem Employee and Employee Problems
209(15)
Situation: What Do We Do about a First-Class Grouch?
209(1)
Is There Such a Person as a ``Problem Employee''?
210(2)
Dealing with the Problem Employee
212(1)
Seven Guidelines
213(1)
A Special Case: The Dead-End Employee
214(2)
Absenteeism
216(2)
The Troubled Employee
218(2)
One and the Same?
220(1)
Special Cases: Some Signs of the Times
221(1)
The Real ``Problem''
222(2)
The Supervisor and the Human Resource Department
224(15)
Situation: A Favor or a Trap?
224(1)
``Personnel'' Equals People
225(1)
A Vital Staff Function
225(1)
A Service of Increasing Value
226(2)
Learning about Your HR Department
228(4)
Putting the HR Department To Work
232(2)
Wanted: Well-Considered Input
234(1)
Understanding Why as Well as What
235(1)
With Friends Like This
236(1)
Emphasis on Service
237(2)
PART IV---THE SUPERVISOR AND THE TASK 239(210)
Ethics and Ethical Standards
241(14)
Situation: Is the Boss Always the Boss?
241(1)
Ethics and the Health Care Manager
242(1)
Medical Ethics: Some of the Issues
243(2)
When Medicine and Business Meet
245(1)
Business Ethics and the Health Care Organization
245(6)
When Codes Clash: Mason versus Green
251(2)
Addressing Ethical Issues
253(1)
The Manager's Responsibility
253(1)
But It Is Everyone's Job
253(2)
Decisions, Decisions
255(13)
Situation: Deciding under Pressure
255(1)
A Fact of Life
256(1)
The Basic Decision-Making Process
256(4)
Constraints
260(3)
Risk, Uncertainty, and Judgment
263(1)
The No-Decision Option
264(1)
The Range of Decisions
264(1)
Responsibility and Leadership
265(1)
Problem Awareness: Often an Essential Pre-Step
266(1)
No Magic Formula
267(1)
Management of Change: Resistance Is Where You Find It
268(10)
Situation: Delayed Change of Command
268(1)
The Nature of Change
269(1)
Inflexibility or Resistance?
270(1)
Changing with an Evolving Role
271(2)
Why Resistance?
273(1)
Deadly Delays: Revisiting Mr. Smith
274(1)
The Supervisor's Approach
275(2)
True Resistance
277(1)
Communication: Not by Spoken Words Alone
278(12)
Situation: The Wilson Letter or the Agents of Wordiness
278(1)
The Written Word
279(1)
Sources of Help
279(1)
Guidelines for Better Letters and Memos
279(4)
Changing Old Habits
283(2)
Sample Letter
285(2)
Attacking the Agents of Wordiness
287(1)
Other Writing
287(1)
Technology Strikes: When the Letter Is an E-Mail
288(1)
A Matter of Practice
289(1)
How To Arrange and Conduct Effective Meetings
290(13)
Situation: The Conference
290(2)
``Let's Schedule a Meeting''
292(1)
Management by Committee
293(1)
Types of Meetings
294(1)
Meeting Preparation
295(2)
Leading a Meeting
297(3)
Cleaning Up ``The Conference''
300(1)
Use or Abuse?
301(2)
Budgeting: Annual Task and Year-Long Implications
303(23)
Situation: ``What's a Budget Besides Lots of Work I Don't Have Time for?''
303(2)
Introducing the Budget
305(2)
The Total Budget
307(3)
Illustration: The X-Ray Department Expense Budget
310(5)
Staffing and Scheduling Considerations
315(2)
The Budgeting Process
317(2)
``Finished'' Is Just Begun
319(3)
Lots of Work? Certainly
322(2)
Control: Awareness Plus Action
324(2)
Quality and Productivity: Sides of the Same Coin
326(14)
Situation: Caught in the Elevator
326(1)
The Total Quality Movement: ''Excellence`` All Over Again?
327(4)
Productivity ``Recycled''
331(6)
Sides of the Same Coin
337(1)
An ``Elevator Speech''
338(2)
Teams, Team Building, and Teamwork
340(20)
Situation: Can You Build an Effective Team from the ``Enemy Camps?''
340(1)
Types of Teams
341(1)
The Project or Employee Team
342(7)
The Departmental Team
349(1)
Team Building and Its Purposes
349(1)
Recognizing Employee Potential
350(2)
The Stages of Team Building
352(2)
The Power of the Team: The Individual
354(1)
Team Building and Leadership Style
355(1)
Guidance for the Team Builder
355(2)
Attitude and Commitment: Everyone's
357(1)
Helen Has Her Work Cut Out for Her
357(3)
Methods Improvement: Making Work---and Life---Easier
360(19)
Situation: Is There a Better Way To Accomplish This Task?
360(1)
Edison-Plus
361(1)
Room for Improvement
361(2)
At the Center of Total Quality Management
363(1)
The Methods Improvement Approach
363(4)
The Tools and Techniques of Methods Improvement
367(4)
Example: The Information Request
371(4)
An Organized Approach to Methods Improvement
375(2)
The Methods-Minded Attitude
377(2)
Reengineering and Reduction in Force
379(14)
Situation: Expanding Responsibilities
379(1)
Reengineering: Perception, Intent, and Reality
380(2)
Reduction-in-Force and Beyond
382(6)
Coping with Your Expanding Responsibilities
388(1)
Resistance to Change: Coping with Dramatic Paradigm Shifts
389(4)
Continuing Education: Your Employees and You
393(15)
Situation: Cross-Training and the Supervisor
393(1)
Why Continuing Education?
394(1)
Commitment
395(1)
Many Options
396(1)
Your Employees
397(5)
An Urgent and Expanding Need
402(3)
Continuing Education and You
405(1)
Your Key Role
406(2)
The Supervisor and the Law
408(17)
Situation: What Kind of Employee?
408(1)
Legal Guides for Supervisory Behavior
408(1)
The National Labor Relations Act
409(3)
Wage and Hour Laws
412(5)
Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity
417(5)
Special Concern: Sexual Harassment
422(1)
Who Needs More Rules?
423(2)
Organizational Communication: Looking Up, Down, and Laterally
425(12)
Situation: The Unrequested Information
425(1)
What Goes Down May Not Come Up
425(3)
Your Role in Organizational Communication
428(5)
The Grapevine
433(1)
Dealing with ``The Unrequested Information''
434(1)
Which Way Do You Face?
435(2)
Unions: Avoiding Them When Possible and Living with Them When Necessary
437(12)
Situation: The Confrontation
437(1)
Can Unionization Be Avoided?
438(1)
Health Care: More and More a Special Case
439(1)
The Supervisor's Position
440(1)
The Organizing Approach
441(1)
Unequal Positions
442(1)
Your Active Role
443(3)
The Bargaining Election
446(1)
If the Union Wins
447(2)
Annotated Bibliography 449(10)
List of Quotations 459(4)
Index 463(14)
About the Author 477

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