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9780761971757

Evaluating, Doing and Writing Research in Psychology : A Step-by-Step Guide for Students

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780761971757

  • ISBN10:

    0761971750

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2001-05-02
  • Publisher: Sage Publications Ltd

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Supplemental Materials

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Summary

Evaluating, Doing and Writing Research in Psychology is a thoroughly revised and expanded co-edition of the highly regarded Reasoning and Argument in Psychology, originally published by UNSW Press, Australia. It represents a comprehensive textbook for all undergraduates in psychology who need to undertake empirical research, taking them step-by-step through the process. In particular, it offers the a range of study skills enabling the student to understand the complex processes involved with psychological research, not really covered in other texts.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments viii
Introduction: The problem 1(1)
Psychology in the academy
2(2)
Psychology in the public domain
4(1)
Arguments strong and weak: Some examples
5(6)
Understanding and Evaluating Statements
11(21)
Introduction
12(1)
Understanding statements
12(10)
Evaluating statements
22(8)
Summary
30(2)
Understanding and Evaluating Arguments
32(36)
Understanding arguments
33(9)
Evaluating arguments
42(21)
Evaluation and understanding
63(2)
Summary
65(3)
Explanation
68(33)
Introduction
69(2)
Causal and law-based explanations
71(7)
Causal explanation
78(1)
Evaluating explanations
79(11)
Induction and explanation
90(3)
`Understanding' vs `explanation': Discourse as evidence
93(5)
Summary
98(3)
Definition and Clarification of Terms
101(28)
Introduction
102(3)
Stipulative (nominal) and descriptive definitions
105(5)
Operational definitions
110(5)
Definitions and criteria for the use of theoretical terms
115(2)
Things, properties and relations
117(6)
Jargon and obscurantism
123(2)
Summary
125(4)
Interpreting Psychological Evidence
129(36)
Introduction
130(1)
The comparative nature of evidence
131(9)
Correlation and cause
140(9)
Evidence from analogies
149(12)
Summary
161(4)
Some Common Weaknesses in Psychological Argument
165(27)
Illegitimate appeals and assertions
166(5)
Misleading dichotomies
171(3)
Relative terms
174(4)
`Missing links'
178(3)
`Is' and `ought'
181(7)
Summary
188(4)
Levels of Explanation
192(42)
Introduction
193(3)
Reductionist explanations
196(10)
Folk psychological explanations
206(1)
Information processing/representational explanations
207(2)
Three levels of explanation of complex systems
209(3)
Componential explanations
212(6)
Connectionism
218(3)
Functional explanations
221(1)
Evolutionary explanations
222(8)
Summary
230(4)
Measurement and Numerical Reasoning
234(20)
Introduction
235(1)
Numerical data in psychology
236(4)
Is the measurement of psychological attributes possible?
240(4)
Reasoning with numerical codings
244(5)
Further issues in numerical reasoning
249(2)
Summary
251(3)
Researching Psychological Projects
254(12)
Using the library
255(7)
Studying the relevant literature
262(4)
Writing Psychological Essays
266(31)
Introduction
267(2)
Essay structure
269(6)
The question
275(3)
Evidence
278(1)
The conclusion
278(1)
Style
279(7)
Conventions
286(6)
Summary
292(5)
Reporting Observational Studies
297(12)
The Introduction to a report
299(2)
Method
301(3)
Results (Including statistical analysis)
304(2)
Discussion
306(2)
Summary
308(1)
References 309(6)
Name index 315(2)
Subject index 317

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