9780534176723

Experiencing Music Technology (with DVD-ROM)

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780534176723

  • ISBN10:

    0534176720

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2005-03-23
  • Publisher: Schirmer
  • View Upgraded Edition

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

Viewport I: MUSICICANS AND THEIR USE OF TECHNOLOGY. 1. People Making Technology. 2. People Using Technology. 3. People Questioning Technology. 4. People Helping With Technology. Viewport II: COMPUTER AND INTERNET CONCEPTS FOR MUSICIANS. 5. Computer Operating Systems and Internet Software. 6. Computer and Networking Concepts. 7. The Mechanics of Computers and Networking. Viewport III: DIGITAL AUDIO BASICS. 8. Acoustics, Digital Audio, and Music Synthesis. 9. Software for Capturing, Editing, and Storing Digital Audio. 10. Building a No-Frills Digital Audio Workstation. Viewport IV: DOING MORE WITH DIGIAL AUDIO. 11. Sonic Realism: MPEG, Surround Sound, and Laser Discs. 12. Software for Multiple Tracks and Channels. 13. Hardware for Multi-Channel Digital Audio. Viewport V: MUSIC SEQUENCING AND MIDI BASICS. 14. How MIDI Works. 15. Software Techniques for MIDI Sequencing. 16. MIDI Hardware: Interfaces, Keyboards, and Sound Modules. Viewport VI: DOING MORE WITH MIDI AND BEYOND. 17. Adventures in Sound Shaping and Synthesis. 18. Extending MIDI: Controllers, SoundFonts, and Timing. Viewport VII: MUSIC NOTATION. 19. Coding Systems for Music Notation and Performance. 20. Software for Music Notation. 21. Notation Hardware: Input Devices, Scanners and OMR, and Printers. Viewport VIII: COMPUTER-AIDED INSTRUCTION IN MUSIC. 22. Music Software for Knowledge and Skill Development. 23. New Directions in Music Instruction Software. Viewport IX: PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER.

Table of Contents

Preface xxiii
So, What's New? xxiv
Book Content and Goals xxv
Experiencing Music Technology Companion DVD-ROM and Support Website xxvi
Icons in the Margin of the Book xxvi
Definitions xxvii
Acknowledgments xxviii
About the Authors xxix
VIEWPORT I Musicians and Their Use of Technology
1(24)
Overview
1(2)
Objectives
1(1)
DVD-ROM Software Projects
2(1)
People Making Technology
3(9)
Ballet of Technology and Music
3(1)
Five Periods of Technology History
4(8)
Period I (1600s--mid-1800s)
4(1)
Period II (mid--1800s-early 1900s)
4(1)
Period III (early 1900s--mid-1900s)
5(2)
Period IV (mid--1900s-1970s)
7(1)
Period V (1970s--present)
8(4)
People Using Technology
12(5)
The Unexpected Turn
12(1)
Innovation and Creativity
13(2)
Pacing
15(1)
Music Technology in Practice
15(2)
People Questioning Technology
17(4)
Ten Misconceptions
17(3)
No. 1. Does technology refer only to hardware?
17(1)
No. 2. Is there intimidating hidden ``knowledge'' inside the hardware?
17(1)
No. 3. Will the hardware break if something is done incorrectly?
18(1)
No. 4. Isn't computer technology really reserved for the technical elite?
18(1)
No. 5. Doesn't computer technology take too long to learn?
18(1)
No. 6. Isn't computer technology only for the young?
18(1)
No. 7. Doesn't technology remove the creative spirit, producing music that is antiseptic or sterile?
19(1)
No. 8. Aren't computers, digital audio, MIDI, and DVDs, when used for teaching about music, just another expensive set of technological gimmicks that take time and money away from the real business of music education?
19(1)
No. 9. Doesn't technology, not music, become the focus?
19(1)
No. 10. Isn't it true that technology replaces musicians' jobs?
19(1)
Resulting Attitudes
20(1)
People Helping with Technology
21(4)
People with Technical Skills
22(1)
Computer Facilities
22(1)
Print and Nonprint Materials
22(1)
Professional Associations
22(3)
VIEWPORT II Computer and Internet Concepts for Musicians
25(50)
Overview
25(1)
Objectives
25(1)
DVD-ROM Software Projects
26(1)
Music Technology in Practice
26(1)
Chi Fan
26(1)
Computer Operating Systems and Internet Software
27(19)
The Desktop: Your Computer and Its Operating System
27(2)
The Function of an Operating System
27(1)
Streams of Information
27(2)
Look and Feel: Graphic User Interface (GUI)
29(1)
Staying Organized with Hierarchical File Structure
29(2)
Volumes, Folders, Files
29(1)
Naming Files
30(1)
Important Work Habits
31(4)
Saving Files
31(1)
Importance of Copyright
32(1)
Viruses Defined
33(1)
Backing Up
34(1)
Additional Good Habits for Computer Maintenance
34(1)
Other Operating Systems
35(1)
Unix
35(1)
Linux and the World of Open Source Code
35(1)
Extending the Desktop: Connecting to the Internet
36(1)
Types of Internet Software
36(10)
Web Surfing and Searching
37(4)
Browsing Software Support for Other Internet Services
41(1)
Electronic Mail/Listservs
41(1)
Digital Audio Purchasing/Sharing
42(1)
Chat
43(1)
Forums, News Reading, and File Transfers
44(1)
Additional Uses of the Internet with Music Software
45(1)
Computer and Networking Concepts
46(11)
Analog to Digital: Computers and the Analog World
46(2)
Counting and Thinking with 1 and 0
47(1)
Computer Bits and Bytes
48(1)
Serial and Parallel: Computers and Their Peripherals
48(1)
Expressing Data in Parallel Form
48(1)
Expressing Data in Serial Form
48(1)
Internet Protocols: Computers Connecting to the Internet
49(3)
Internet Addressing
50(1)
Server Internet Addresses
50(1)
E-Mail Internet Addresses
51(1)
The Internet 2 Fast Lane
51(1)
File Formats: Sharing Files over the Internet
52(5)
Packaging and Compressing Files
52(1)
Exchanging Documents with Universal File Formats
53(2)
Exchanging Digital Audio and MIDI
55(1)
Exchanging Graphics and Video
55(2)
The Mechanics of Computers and Networking
57(18)
Computer Hardware Operations and the IPOS Model
57(10)
Interfaces
57(3)
Process
60(2)
Input
62(1)
Output
63(1)
Storage
63(3)
CD and DVD Storage
66(1)
Networking: Routes to Connectivity
67(8)
Getting Access
67(1)
Talking among Computers
67(1)
Network Topologies
68(2)
Getting Connected
70(5)
VIEWPORT III Digital Audio Basics
75(68)
The Big Picture
75(2)
Viewport III Overview
77(1)
Objectives
78(1)
Music Technology in Practice
78(3)
Nate DeYoung
78(1)
Kevin Robbins
79(1)
DVD-ROM Software Projects
80(1)
Acoustics, Digital Audio, and Music Synthesis
81(22)
Acoustical and Perceptual Dimensions of Sound
81(9)
Vibrations, Frequency, and Amplitude
84(2)
Envelopes
86(1)
Harmonic Spectrum
87(1)
Overtones
88(1)
Harmonic Spectrum and Fourier's Theorem
88(2)
Summary of the Acoustic Properties of Sound
90(1)
Concepts of Digital Audio and Sampling: Analog to Digital and Back
90(5)
Sampling Rates and Quantizing
92(1)
Optimizing the Quality of Digital Audio
92(3)
Formats and Compression for Storing Digital Audio Files
95(4)
Sound Compression
96(1)
Increasing Compression While Fooling the Ear
97(1)
Streaming Audio Files for the Internet
98(1)
Varieties of Music Synthesis Techniques
99(4)
Analog Synthesis: Additive, Subtractive, and Distortive
99(1)
Physical Modeling
100(1)
Digital Wave Synthesis
101(1)
Granular Synthesis
102(1)
Software for Capturing, Editing, and Storing Digital Audio
103(24)
Working with Digital Audio on the Web
103(5)
Obtaining Web Music Files
104(1)
Organizing and Playing Web Music Files
105(1)
Creating and Storing Your Own Web Music Audio
106(2)
Working with Streamed Media
108(1)
Streaming Audio in Action
108(1)
Preparing Your Computer for Digital Audio Recording
109(1)
PC Computers
109(1)
Macintosh Computers
110(1)
Using Digital Audio Editing Software
110(17)
What Is Digital Audio Editing Software?
110(1)
Basic Capture and Display of Digital Audio Editing Software
111(1)
Basic Editing and File Management
112(2)
Advanced Editing and File Management
114(4)
Effects Processing
118(3)
Advanced Effects Processing
121(4)
Plug-In Support for Digital Audio Editors
125(2)
Building a No-Frills Digital Audio Workstation
127(16)
IPOS Model
127(1)
Basic Digital Audio Hardware: ADCs and DACs
128(3)
Digital Audio Interface
129(1)
Input and Output: Connecting to the Outside World
130(1)
Sound Drivers and Latency: Who's in Charge Here?
131(1)
Sorting Out Plugs and Jacks
132(2)
Adding a Mixer and Performance Options with EMT-3
134(3)
Mixer Input Controls
136(1)
Mixer Output Controls
137(1)
Microphones
137(2)
Storage Devices for Digital Audio Work
139(1)
CD/DVD-R and-RW Storage
140(1)
Digital Music Players
140(1)
Speakers and Recorders
140(3)
VIEWPORT IV Doing More with Digital Audio
143(70)
Overview
143(1)
Objectives
143(1)
Music Technology in Practice
144(3)
John Shirley
144(1)
Aaron Paolucci
144(2)
DVD-ROM Software Projects
146(1)
Sonic Realism: MPEG, Surround Sound, and Laser Discs
147(20)
Multichannel Digital Audio Formats
147(8)
MPEG
148(4)
Surround-Sound Audio Formats
152(3)
CD and DVD Laser Disc Formats
155(12)
General Characteristics of CD and DVD Laser Discs
155(3)
Compact Laser Disc Playables and Recordables
158(3)
Digital Versatile Discs (DVDs)
161(6)
Software for Multiple Tracks and Channels
167(30)
Important Terms
167(3)
Types of Multiple-Track Software
167(2)
Tracks and Channels
169(1)
Effects, Inserts, and Buses
169(1)
Preparing Your Computer for Digital Audio and MIDI Input and Output
170(1)
PC Computers
170(1)
Macintosh Computers
170(1)
Recording, Editing, and Using Built-In Effects
171(8)
Starting a Project
172(1)
Editing
173(3)
Built-In Effects
176(3)
Effects Plug-Ins
179(4)
Categories of Plug-Ins
179(1)
How Plug-Ins Are Called into Action
179(1)
Overview of Effects Plug-Ins
180(3)
Loop-Based Software
183(7)
Slicing Digital Audio
184(1)
The ACID Scene and Looping Software
184(3)
Other Looping Software
187(3)
Mixing, Mastering, and Distributing
190(7)
Mixing and Mastering: Really the Same Thing?
190(1)
Working with Mixing and Mastering
191(1)
Tips for Mixing and Mastering
191(1)
Mixing with Surround Sound
192(1)
Distribution
193(4)
Hardware for Multichannel Digital Audio
197(16)
IPOS Model for Multichannel Digital Audio
197(1)
Superheroes: The DSP Chips
198(1)
One-on-One with Digital: S/PDIF, AES/EBU, ADAT, Firewire, and USB
199(2)
S/PDIF and AES/EBU: Close Cousins
199(1)
ADAT
200(1)
EMT Digital Audio Workstation Goes Multichannel
201(5)
Expanding to Multichannel Digital Sound
202(3)
Moving Up to Surround Sound
205(1)
Recording and Playback in the Digital Realm
206(7)
CD and DVD Recordable Drives
207(1)
DAT and ADAT Recorders
207(1)
MiniDisc (MD) Recorders
207(1)
Stand-Alone Digital Recorders
208(3)
Surround-Sound Amplifiers and Speakers
211(2)
VIEWPORT V Music Sequencing and MIDI Basics
213(56)
Overview
213(1)
Objectives
213(1)
Music Technology in Practice
214(2)
Jeff Shuter
214(1)
DVD-ROM Software Projects
215(1)
How MIDI Works
216(13)
MIDI Sound Structures
217(1)
MIDI Performance Language
218(3)
Channel Messages
219(1)
System Messages
220(1)
General MIDI
221(3)
Storing and Exchanging MIDI Files
224(1)
Experiencing MIDI Software and Hardware
225(4)
Software Techniques for MIDI Sequencing
229(21)
Basic Design of Sequencing Software
230(3)
What Does Sequencing Software Do?
230(3)
Basics of Using Sequencers with MIDI Data
233(10)
Entering MIDI Data
234(3)
Creating the Sequences
237(2)
Editing and Saving Sequences
239(4)
Plug-Ins: Applying MIDI Effects and Software-Based Instruments
243(1)
MIDI Effects
243(1)
Virtual Instruments
243(1)
Adding Digital Audio
244(4)
Basic Entry and Data Representation
245(1)
Effects Processing
245(1)
Mixing and Mastering
246(2)
Saving Sequencing Files
248(2)
MIDI Content Only
249(1)
Mixed Data (MIDI/Digital Audio)
249(1)
MIDI Hardware: Interfaces, Keyboards, and Sound Modules
250(19)
MIDI Hardware Basics
251(1)
MIDI Interfaces
251(4)
MIDI Networks: Physical and Virtual
252(2)
MIDI THRUs, Mergers, and Patchbays
254(1)
Beyond 32 Channels
254(1)
Basic MIDI Keyboard Controllers and Sound Modules
255(4)
MIDI Sound Modules
255(3)
Keyboard Controllers
258(1)
MIDI Workstations
259(4)
Keyboard
260(1)
Alternative Controllers
261(1)
MIDI Capabilities
262(1)
Sound Generation and Drum Kits, Sample Playing, and Real-Time Sampling
263(6)
Drum Kits and Sounds
264(1)
Synthesis and Digital Effects
264(2)
Sequencers
266(1)
Digital Expansion and Connections
267(1)
Workstations---In Conclusion
268(1)
VIEWPORT VI Doing More with MIDI and Beyond
269(62)
Overview
269(1)
Objectives
269(1)
Music Technology in Practice
270(2)
Henry Panion III
270(1)
DVD-ROM Software Projects
271(1)
Adventures in Sound Shaping and Synthesis
272(39)
Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) Software
272(21)
Interface Features
273(6)
Editing and Input/Output
279(5)
Plug-In Effects
284(3)
Mixing and Mastering with DAW Software
287(6)
Specialized Plug-In Samplers, Synthesizers, and Virtual Instruments
293(11)
How Specialized Plug-Ins Are Used
298(1)
Virtual Instruments
298(2)
Synthesizers
300(3)
Synthesizer/Sampler Combinations
303(1)
``All-in-One'' Virtual Studios
304(4)
Reason
304(3)
ReWire Connections
307(1)
The Future of ``All-in-One'' Virtual Studios
308(1)
Programming Environments
308(3)
Max/MSP
308(1)
Other Programming Approaches
309(2)
Extending MIDI: Controllers, SoundFonts, and Timing
311(20)
Controller Cornucopia: Drums, Guitars, Winds, and More
311(7)
Drum Controllers
312(2)
Guitar and String Controllers
314(2)
Voice Controllers
316(1)
Wind Controllers
316(1)
Mind-Expanding MIDI Controllers
317(1)
New Modes of Instrument Expression
318(2)
Integrating MIDI and Digital Audio
320(3)
MIDI Control Surfaces
321(2)
Subjective Factors for MIDI Controllers
323(1)
Enhancing the MIDI Sound Palette: GS, XG, SoundFonts, and DLS
323(2)
MIDI SoundFonts
324(1)
MIDI Down-Loadable Sounds (DLS)
324(1)
MIDI and Audio Timing: SMPTE, Word Clock, mLAN, and More
325(6)
Who's Conducting This Group?
325(1)
Keeping the Tape Time
326(2)
Keeping the MIDI Time: MIDI Time Codes
328(1)
ADAT, Word Clock, and Digidesign Sync
328(1)
mLAN Music Network and Word Clock
329(2)
VIEWPORT VII Music Notation
331(72)
Overview
331(1)
Objectives
331(1)
Music Technology in Practice
332(3)
Mike Wallace
332(1)
Jouni Koskimaki
333(1)
DVD-ROM Software Projects
334(1)
Coding Systems for Music Notation and Performance
335(22)
How Is Notation Represented in a Computer?
335(2)
Data Structures for Performing and Display
335(1)
Translating between Performance and Display Data
336(1)
A Simple Music Coding
337(2)
Tour of Computer Music-Coding Systems
339(14)
Pre-1950s: Mechanical Music Coding
339(2)
1950s to 1960s: Notation to Feed the First Computer Music Synthesizers
341(1)
Mid-1960s to Mid-1970s: Friendlier Text-Based Music Coding
341(3)
1970s to Early 1980s: Experimentation and Graphic Display of Notation
344(1)
Early 1980s: Personal Computers and Consumer Music Systems
345(1)
Mid-1980s: The Birth of Desktop Music Publishing
346(1)
Late 1980s and 1990s: Intelligent Rule-Based Music-Coding Systems
347(1)
1990s: Seeking Interchangeable Notation-Coding Systems
348(3)
2000s: Web-Based Notation-Coding Systems
351(2)
Music Fonts for Notation
353(4)
Bitmapped Versus Outline Fonts
354(1)
Coding Music-Font Symbols
354(1)
Lots of Music Fonts
355(1)
Is WYPWYP Music Software Possible?
355(2)
Software for Music Notation
357(40)
Content and Context: What Do You Need?
357(3)
Basic Operational Features
360(8)
Help
360(1)
Interface Design
361(4)
Getting Started
365(1)
Score Display
365(1)
Playback, Printing, and Distribution
366(2)
Note Entry and Basic Score Design
368(8)
Methods of Note Entry
368(5)
Mass Editing
373(1)
Other Basic Features for Score Design
374(2)
Advanced Editing
376(13)
Editing Aids
376(1)
Transposition and Automatic Arrangements
377(3)
Enhancing the Score
380(6)
Text and Lyrics
386(2)
Chord Symbols and Tablature Notation
388(1)
Play, Print, and Save
389(5)
Playback Options
389(1)
Print Controls
389(3)
Saving and Distribution
392(2)
Advanced Capabilities
394(3)
Additional Capabilities
394(1)
Plug-Ins
395(1)
Finale 2005
395(1)
Sibelius 3
395(2)
Notation Hardware: Input Devices, Scanners, and OMR
397(6)
Input Devices for Music Notation
397(3)
Text and Key Codes from the Computer Keyboard
397(2)
Graphic Palettes and a Mouse
399(1)
MIDI Controllers
399(1)
Singing in the Notes
400(1)
Scanners and OMR
400(3)
Optical Music Recognition (OMR)
400(1)
The Mechanics of a Scanner
401(2)
VIEWPORT VIII Computer-Aided Instruction in Music
403(42)
Overview
403(1)
Objectives
403(1)
Music Technology in Practice
404(2)
Susan Young
404(1)
DVD-ROM Software Projects
405(1)
Music Software for Knowledge and Skill Development
406(18)
Importance of CAI
406(2)
Categories of CAI Software: Approach and Content
408(3)
Drill-and-Practice
409(1)
Flexible Practice
409(1)
Guided Instruction
410(1)
Exploratory/Creative
410(1)
Teacher Resource
410(1)
Internet-Based
411(1)
Examples of Knowledge and Skill-Development Software
411(13)
Beginning-Skills Software for Knowledge and Skill Development
411(2)
Drill-and-Practice Software Examples
413(2)
Flexible-Practice Software Examples
415(4)
Guided Instruction
419(3)
Game-Based
422(2)
New Directions in Music-Instruction Software
424(21)
Examples of New Directions in Music-Instruction Software
424(17)
Exploratory/Creative-Software Examples
424(8)
Teacher-Resource Software Examples
432(4)
Internet-Based Software Examples
436(5)
What to Choose: A Matter of Content and Need
441(1)
Software from Past Viewports and CAI
442(3)
VIEWPORT IX Putting It All Together
445(4)
DVD-ROM Tutorial Materials and Selected Readings
445(1)
Expanding Your Skills and Creative Urge
445(2)
Closing Note
447(2)
Appendix A: Selected Readings by Viewport 449(4)
Appendix B: EMT Workstation Equipment Codes 453(2)
Index 455

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