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9781590590225

Expert Oracle 9i Database Administration

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781590590225

  • ISBN10:

    1590590228

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2003-04-01
  • Publisher: Springer-Verlag New York Inc

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

This is the only real Oracle9idatabase administration book in the market! This 1,000+ page book enables a beginner or intermediate level Oracle DBA or Oracle developer/manager to master the art of building and managing complex Oracle9idatabases.Expert Oracle9iDatabase Administrationis thorough in covering all aspects of the 9idatabase, and includes a UNIX primer as well as an introduction to SQL and PL/SQL. Author Sam Alapati covers the entire spectrum of the new Oracle9iRDBMS software and clearly explains how to use all of its powerful features.Currently there is no one book that includes the necessary UNIX administration, Windows NT management, and SQL backgrounds and the necessary database administration principles. This book fills that gap well, by providing all the necessary material in one comprehensive volume.It takes several courses as well as mastery of several Oracle manuals to become a proficient DBA. Readers will be able to become expert Oracle DBAs by using this book.Expert Oracle9iDatabase Administrationis designed to be the most complete Oracle9idatabase text available today.

Table of Contents

About the Author xxxi
About the Technical Reviewer xxxii
Acknowledgments xxxiii
Introduction xxiv
Part One Database Basics, Data Modeling, and UNIX/Linux
1(104)
Chapter 1 The Oracle DBA's World
3(22)
The Oracle DBA's Role
3(7)
The DBA's Security Role
4(2)
The DBA's System Management Role
6(2)
The DBA's Database Design Role
8(2)
Different DBA Job Classifications
10(1)
Types of Databases
10(2)
Online Transaction Processing and
Decision Support System Databases
11(1)
Development, Test, and Production Databases
11(1)
Background and Training
12(9)
Background and Training for an Oracle DBA
12(3)
Certification
15(1)
Resources and Organizations for Oracle DBAs
16(2)
Managing High-Performance Databases
18(1)
Improving Your Troubleshooting Skills
19(2)
The Daily Routine of a Typical Oracle DBA
21(1)
Some General Advice
21(2)
Know When You Need Help
22(1)
Remember You Are Not Alone
22(1)
Think Outside the Box
22(1)
Summary
23(2)
Chapter 2 Relational Database Modeling and Database Design
25(30)
Relational Databases: A Brief Introduction
26(1)
The Relational Database Model
26(4)
Database schemas
27(1)
Data Definition and Data Manipulation Languages
27(1)
Relational Algebra
28(1)
Relational Calculus
29(1)
SQL and Relational Theory
29(1)
Relational Database Life Cycle
30(1)
Requirements Gathering and Analysis
30(1)
Logical Database Design
31(14)
Entity-Relationship Modeling
32(6)
Normalization
38(2)
The Normal Forms
40(4)
ERM Tools: The Oracle Designer
44(1)
Physical Database Design
45(3)
Transformation of Entities and Relationships
46(1)
Designing Different Types of Tables
47(1)
Table Structures and Naming Conventions
47(1)
Column Specifications and Choosing Data Types
47(1)
Business Rules and Data Integrity
47(1)
Implementation of the Physical Design
48(1)
Database Sizing and Database Storage
48(1)
Implementing Database Security
48(1)
Moving to the New System
49(1)
Reverse Engineering a Database
49(1)
Object-Relational and Object Databases
49(4)
The Relational Model
50(1)
The Object Model
50(1)
The Object-Relational Model
51(2)
Summary
53(2)
Chapter 3 Essential UNIX (and Linux) for the Oracle DBA
55(50)
Overview of the UNIX Operating System
55(2)
Understanding the UNIX Shell(s)
57(3)
Accessing the UNIX System
58(1)
Logging Into and Logging Out of UNIX
58(2)
Overview of Basic UNIX Commands
60(3)
Introducing the UNIX Environment
63(2)
Displaying the Environment
64(1)
Working with Shell Variables
65(1)
Modifying the Environment
65(1)
Input and Output in UNIX
65(1)
Navigating Files and Directories in UNIX
66(8)
Files in the UNIX System
67(1)
Types of Files
67(1)
Linking Files
67(1)
Managing Files
68(1)
Permissions: Reading from or Writing to Files in UNIX
69(3)
UNIX Directory Structure
72(1)
Directory Management
72(1)
Important UNIX Directories
73(1)
Writing Files with the vi Editor
74(2)
Creating and Modifying Files Using vi
74(1)
Using the Head and Tail Commands
75(1)
Shell Scripting
76(3)
Creating a Simple UNIX Shell Program
76(1)
Using Shell Variables
76(3)
Control Flow Structures in Korn Shell Programming
79(3)
Looping
79(2)
Conditional Branching
81(1)
Dealing with UNIX Processes
82(2)
Running Programs in the Background with Nohup
83(1)
Terminating Processes with the Kill Command
83(1)
UNIX System Administration and the Oracle DBA
84(8)
UNIX Backup and Restore Utilities
84(1)
The Crontab and Automation of Scripts
85(1)
Using Telnet
86(1)
Remote Login and Remote Copy
87(1)
Using ssh, the Secure Shell
87(1)
Using FTP to Send and Receive Files
87(1)
UNIX System Performance Monitoring Tools
88(4)
Disks and Storage in UNIX
92(3)
Disk Storage Configuration Choices
92(1)
Monitoring Disk Usage
93(1)
Disk Storage, Performance, and Availability
94(1)
RAID Systems
95(6)
RAID Levels
96(2)
Choosing the Ideal Disk Configuration
98(2)
Redundant Disk Controllers
100(1)
RAID and Backups
100(1)
RAID and Oracle
101(1)
Storage Technologies
101(3)
Storage Area Networks
102(1)
Networked Attached Storage
102(1)
InfiniBand
103(1)
Oracle and Storage System Compatibility
103(1)
Summary
104(1)
Part Two The Oracle
105(156)
Chapter 4 Installing the Oracle9i RDBMS
107(32)
Installing Oracle on UNIX Systems
107(3)
Reviewing the Documentation
108(1)
Determining Disk and Memory Requirements
109(1)
Following the Optimal Flexible Architecture
110(5)
Mount Points
112(1)
Directory and File Naming Conventions
112(3)
Performing Preinstallation Tasks
115(7)
UNIX System Administrator's Tasks
116(4)
Oracle Owner's Tasks
120(2)
A Final Checklist for the Installation
122(1)
Installing the Oracle Software
123(11)
After the Installation
134(2)
UNIX Post-Installation Tasks
134(1)
User Oracle Post-Installation Tasks
135(1)
Uninstalling Oracle
136(1)
Summary
137(2)
Chapter 5 Introduction to the Oracle9i Architecture
139(58)
Oracle Database Structures
139(20)
The Logical Structures
140(6)
Physical Database Structures
146(6)
Trace Files
152(1)
Data Files and Tablespaces
152(5)
Automatic Undo Management
157(2)
Oracle Managed Files
159(1)
Oracle Processes
159(7)
Interaction Between the User and Oracle Processes
160(1)
The Server Process
160(1)
The Background Processes
161(5)
Oracle Memory Structures
166(12)
Oracle System Global Area (SGA)
167(8)
The Program Global Area (PGA)
175(3)
Monitoring Memory Allocation
178(7)
Dynamically Modifying the SGA
181(2)
Using Oracle's SGA and PGA Advisories
183(2)
Managing Memory Parameters with Oracle Enterprise Manager
185(2)
A Simple Oracle Database Transaction
187(2)
Data Consistency and Data Concurrency
189(3)
The Database Writer and the Write Ahead Protocol
190(1)
The System Change Number
190(1)
The Central Role of the Oracle Control File
191(1)
The Oracle Data Dictionary and the Dynamic Performance Views
192(3)
The Oracle Data Dictionary
192(1)
The Dynamic Performance (V$) Views
193(1)
The Oracle Optimizer
194(1)
Oracle Enterprise Manager
195(1)
Summary
195(2)
Chapter 6 Using SQL*Plus and iSQL*Plus
197(40)
SQL*Plus for the DBA
197(12)
Using SQL*Plus in Interactive and Noninteractive Modes
198(1)
SQL*Plus Commands and SQL Commands
198(1)
SQL*Plus Security
199(3)
Setting the SQL*Plus Environment with the Set Command
202(1)
Setting Common SQL*Plus Variables
203(3)
SQL*Plus Command Line Arguments
206(1)
Removing Settings with the Clear Command
207(1)
The Store Command
208(1)
The Show Command
208(1)
Exiting SQL*Plus
208(1)
Key SOL*Plus "Performing" Commands
209(9)
The Sqlprompt Command
209(1)
The Describe Command
209(1)
The Host Command
210(1)
The Spool Command
210(1)
The Accept and Prompt Commands
211(1)
The Execute Command
211(1)
The Pause Command
211(1)
Creating Command Files in SQL*Plus
212(1)
Saving SQL Commands to a File
212(1)
Executing SQL*Plus Scripts
213(1)
Executing a SQL*Plus Command Script
213(2)
Creating a Windows Batch Script
215(1)
The Define and Undefine Commands
216(1)
Using Comments in SQL*Plus
217(1)
Listing Your SQL Commands
217(1)
Editing Within SQL*plus
218(5)
Inserting and Deleting Lines in SQL*Plus
219(2)
Adding to Text
221(1)
Incorporating Comments with the Remark Command
221(1)
Copying Tables with the Copy Command
221(1)
Making DML Changes Permanent with SQL*Plus
222(1)
Creating Web Pages Using SQL*Plus
222(1)
Key SOL*Plus Database Administration Commands
223(1)
The Recover Command
223(1)
The Start and Shutdown Commands
223(1)
The Archivelog Command
223(1)
Commands for Formatting SQL*Plus Output and Creating Reports
224(2)
The Break Command
224(1)
The Column Command
224(1)
The Compute Command
225(1)
The Repfooter Command
225(1)
The Repheader Command
225(1)
The Btitle and Ttitle Commands
225(1)
Using SQL to Generate SOL
226(1)
Introducing the Oraclegi iSQL*Plus Interface
227(9)
Installing the iSQL*Plus Software
228(1)
Configuring iSQL*Plus
228(2)
Using the iSQL*Plus Interface
230(3)
Authentication Levels
233(2)
Executing Statements
235(1)
A Security Warning for iSQL*Plus
236(1)
Summary
236(1)
Chapter 7 Schema Management in Oracle9i
237(72)
Types of SQL Statements in Oracle
237(4)
System Control Statements
238(1)
Session Control Statements
239(1)
Data Manipulation Statements
239(1)
Transaction Control Statements
240(1)
Data Definition Statements
240(1)
Oracle Schema Management
241(1)
Creating and Managing Tablespaces
242(19)
Locally and Dictionary Managed Tablespaces
243(1)
Creating Locally Managed Tablespaces
244(12)
Creating a Simple Table
256(5)
Special Oracle Tables
261(16)
Temporary Tables
261(2)
Index-Organized Tables
263(2)
External Tables
265(2)
Partitioned Tables
267(7)
Data Dictionary Views for Managing Tables
274(3)
Clusters
277(1)
Hash Clusters
277(1)
Oracle Indexes
277(8)
Guidelines for Creating Indexes
279(1)
Oracle Index Schemes
280(1)
Creating a Simple Index
281(1)
Bitmap Indexes
281(1)
Reverse Key Indexes
282(1)
Function-Based Indexes
282(1)
Partitioned Indexes
282(2)
Monitoring Index Usage
284(1)
Index Maintenance
285(1)
Database Integrity Constraint Management
285(6)
Primary Key Constraints
286(1)
Not Null Constraints
287(1)
Check Constraints
287(1)
Unique Constraints
287(1)
Referential Integrity Constraints
288(1)
Integrity Constraint States
288(1)
Disabling Integrity Constraints
289(1)
Rely Constraints
290(1)
Deferrable and Immediate Constraints
290(1)
Using Synonyms
291(3)
Creating a Public Synonym
292(1)
Creating a Private Synonym
293(1)
Viewing Information on Synonyms
294(1)
Using Sequences
294(2)
Using Triggers
296(1)
Using Views
296(1)
Using Materialized Views
297(10)
Using the Summary Advisor
298(5)
Creating Materialized Views
303(4)
Summary
307(2)
Chapter 8 Oracle Transaction Management
309
Transactions
310(1)
Anatomy of a SQL Transaction
311(1)
Parsing
311(1)
Binding
312(1)
Execution
312(1)
Transaction Properties
312(1)
Transaction Concurrency Control
313(5)
Concurrency Problems
314(1)
Schedules and Serializability
315(1)
The ISO Transaction Standard
315(1)
Oracle Transaction Management
316(2)
Oracle's Isolation Levels
318(4)
Changing the Default Isolation Level
319(1)
The Read-Only Isolation Level
320(1)
The Serializable Isolation Level
320(1)
The Read Committed vs. the Serializable Level of Isolation
320(2)
Implementing Oracle's Concurrency Control
322(10)
Oracle Locking Methods
323(1)
Oracle Lock Types
324(1)
Oracle Lock Modes
325(3)
Explicit Locking in Oracle
328(2)
Managing Oracle Locks
330(2)
Using Undo Records to Provide Read Consistency
332(8)
Automatic Undo Management
333(7)
Querying Old Data with Oracle Flashback
340(6)
Implementing Flashback Query
342(4)
Discrete Transactions
346(1)
Autonomous Transactions
346(3)
Resumable Storage Allocation
349(3)
Resumable Operations
349(1)
Common Resumable Errors
350(1)
Using the Resumable Space Allocation Feature
350(1)
Notification of Suspended Operations
351(1)
Monitoring Resumable Space Allocation
352(1)
Managing Long Transactions
352(8)
Benefits of Using the Workspace Manager
353(1)
Table Versioning and Workspaces
353(6)
Managing the Workspace Manager
359(1)
Summary
360
Part Three Database Creation, Connectivity,and User Management
261(270)
Chapter 9 Creating an Oracle Database
363(62)
Getting Ready to Create the Database
364(27)
Installing the Software
364(1)
Creating the File System for the Database
365(2)
Ensuring Enough Memory Is Allocated
367(1)
Getting Necessary Authorizations
367(1)
Setting the Operating System Environment Variables
367(1)
Creating the Initialization File
368(2)
Important Oracle9i Initialization Parameters
370(13)
Rollback Segment Parameters
383(8)
Undocumented Initialization Parameters
391(1)
Viewing the Current Initialization Parameter Values
391(2)
Reading the Init.ora File (or the SPFILE)
392(1)
The V$PARAMETER Table
392(1)
The Show Parameter Command
392(1)
Creating the Database
393(16)
Setting Operating System Variables
394(1)
EnsuringYou Have the Privileges to Create Databases
394(1)
Creating the Init.ora File
395(1)
Starting the Oracle Instance
396(3)
The Create Database Script
399(4)
Running Oracle Scripts to Create Data Dictionary Objects
403(1)
Creating Additional Tablespaces
404(2)
Changing the Passwords for the Default Users
406(1)
Changing the Archive Logging Mode
406(2)
Running the Pupbld.sql File
408(1)
What Next?
409(1)
The Server Parameter File (SPFILE)
409(5)
Creating a Server Parameter File
410(3)
Scope of Dynamic Parameter Changes
413(1)
Starting and Shutting Down the Database
414(10)
Starting the Database
414(3)
Restricting Database Access
417(1)
Shutting Down the Database
418(3)
Quiescing a Database
421(2)
Suspending a Database
423(1)
Using V$VIEWS to Monitor Database Status
423(1)
Summary
424(1)
Chapter 10 Connectivity and Networking
425(44)
Oracle Networking and Database Connectivity
426(1)
Networking Concepts: How Oracle Networking Works
427(4)
Database Instance Name
428(1)
Database Service Name
428(1)
Connect Descriptors
429(1)
Connect Identifiers
429(1)
Connect Strings
430(1)
The Listener and Connectivity
431(4)
Automatic Service Registration
432(1)
Listener Commands
433(1)
Listener Management
434(1)
Naming and Connectivity
435(26)
Local Naming
436(3)
Host Naming Method
439(1)
External Naming Method
439(1)
Oracle Names
440(1)
The Directory Naming Method
440(21)
Oracle and Java Database Connectivity
461(7)
Establishing Database Connectivity
461(1)
Working with the Database
462(3)
A Complete Program
465(1)
Connectivity Troubleshooting
466(2)
Summary
468(1)
Chapter 11 User Management and Database Security
469(62)
Managing Users
470(7)
Preliminary Tasks Before Creating Users
470(1)
Creating a New User
471(1)
User Profiles and Resource Management
472(1)
Profile Parameters and Limits
473(4)
Using the Database Resource Manager
477(9)
Using the Database Resource Manager
478(5)
Creating Resource Plans and Plan Directives
483(2)
Enabling the Database Resource Manager
485(1)
Managing Access to Data
486(7)
Privileges in an Oracle Database
486(4)
Roles and Privileges
490(3)
Using Views and Stored Procedures to Manage Privileges
493(1)
Fine-grained Data Security
493(8)
Using Virtual Private Databases
494(6)
Label-Based Access Control
500(1)
Auditing Database Usage
501(10)
Customizing Database Auditing with the Help of Triggers
501(4)
Enabling Auditing
505(1)
Oracle Default Auditing
506(2)
Audit Levels
508(1)
Turning Auditing On
508(1)
Turning Auditing Off
509(1)
Using Fine-grained Auditing
509(2)
Managing the Audit Trail
511(1)
User Authentication
511(6)
Database Authentication of Users
511(5)
External Authentication
516(1)
Proxy Authentication
517(1)
Centralized User Authorization
517(1)
Enterprise User Security
517(2)
Shared Schemas
518(1)
Single Sign-On
518(1)
Data Encryption
518(1)
Using Oracle Internet Directory for Security Management
518(1)
Database Security Do's and Don'ts
519(5)
User Accounts
519(1)
Passwords
519(1)
Operating System Authentication
520(1)
Audit Your Database
520(1)
Grant Privileges Appropriately
520(1)
Set Appropriate Permissions
521(1)
Safeguard the Network and the Listener
522(1)
Keep Up-to-Date
523(1)
Use Oracle's Advanced Security Feature
523(1)
Take Care of Application Security
524(1)
Useful Techniques for Managing Users
524(5)
How to Alter a Profile
524(1)
How to List User Information
525(1)
How to Find Out the Memory Use for Each Active Session
525(1)
What SQL Is a User Currently Executing?
526(1)
How to Log In As a Different User
526(1)
Useful DBA Views to Monitor User Roles and Privileges
527(1)
How to Kill a User's Session
527(2)
Summary
529(2)
Part Four Data Loading, Backup, and Recovery
531(190)
Chapter 12 Loading and Transforming Data
533(46)
Introduction to Data Loading and Transformation
533(3)
Loading Data with ETL
534(1)
Loading Data with the Oracle9iWarehouse Builder
535(1)
The SOL*Loader Utility
536(19)
Different Methods of Data Loading
536(1)
The SQL*Loader Control File
537(10)
Generating Data During the Load
547(1)
Invoking SQL*Loader
548(7)
Using External Tables to Load Data
555(7)
Using External Tables for Data Loading
556(2)
Important Access Parameters for External Tables
558(1)
Using SQL*Loader to Generate External Table Creation Statements
559(3)
Transforming Data
562(11)
Deriving the Data from Existing Tables
563(1)
Using PL/SQL to Transform Data
564(1)
Using SQL to Transform Data
564(9)
Some Useful SOL*Loader Data-Loading Techniques
573(4)
Using the When Clause During Loads
573(1)
Loading the Username into a Table
574(1)
Loading Large Data Fields into a Table
574(1)
Loading a Sequence Number into a Table
575(1)
Loading Data from a Table into an ASCII File
575(1)
Identifying and Removing Duplicate Data
575(1)
Dropping Indexes Before Bulk Data Loads
576(1)
Loading into Multiple Tables
576(1)
Trapping Error Codes from SQL*Loader
576(1)
Loading XML Data into an Oracle XML Database
577(1)
Summary
577(2)
Chapter 13 Using the Export and Import Utilities
579(32)
Exporting and Importing Data
579(1)
Using the Export Utility
580(10)
Export Parameters
581(6)
Invoking the Export Utility
587(3)
Using the Import Utility
590(9)
The Order of Importing
590(1)
Import Parameters
590(8)
Invoking the Import Utility
598(1)
Transportable Tables paces
599(5)
Uses of Transportable Tablespaces
600(1)
Transporting a Tablespace
600(4)
Some Export and Import Techniques
604(6)
Avoiding Common Export/Import Errors
605(1)
Using the Statistics Parameter Appropriately
605(1)
Understanding the Limitations of the Export and Import Utilities
606(1)
Performing an Efficient Database Migration
606(1)
Restoring a Database Using the Export and Import Utilities
607(1)
Exporting and Importing Large Databases
607(1)
UNIX Shell Script to Automate Exports
608(1)
Ensuring the Validity of the Exports
608(1)
Optimizing Exports and Imports
609(1)
Summary
610(1)
Chapter 14 Backing Up Databases
611(62)
Backing Up Oracle Databases
611(8)
Important Backup Terms
612(2)
Backup Strategies
614(5)
Backing Up the "Other" Files
619(1)
A Summary of Backup Methods
619(1)
Oracle Recovery Manager
619(28)
Benefits of RMAN
620(1)
RMAN Architecture
621(1)
Connecting to RMAN
622(2)
Scripting with RMAN
624(1)
Important RMAN Terms
625(2)
RMAN Commands
627(4)
Configuring RMAN
631(6)
Creating the Recovery Catalog
637(5)
Examples of Various Backups Using RMAN
642(3)
Performing Incremental Backups
645(1)
Using RMAN to Perform Online Backups
646(1)
Using a Media Management Layer with RMAN
647(8)
Using Legato Single Server Version with RMAN
648(1)
The LSSV Architecture
649(1)
Installing LSSV
650(1)
Using LSSV
651(1)
LSSV and RMAN
652(3)
Creating Backups with Operating System Commands
655(7)
Making Whole Database Backups
656(5)
Partial Database Backups
661(1)
Monitoring User-Managed Online Backups
662(1)
Enhanced Data Protection for Disaster Recovery
662(4)
Oracle Data Guard and Standby Databases
663(1)
Physical and Logical Standby Databases
664(1)
Protection Modes
665(1)
Database Corruption and Testing Backups
666(4)
Oracle Data Block Corruption
666(1)
Detecting Data Block Corruption
667(2)
Verification of RMAN Backups
669(1)
Oracle's HARD Initiative
670(1)
Techniques and Troubleshooting
670(1)
Monitoring RMAN
670(1)
The ORA_00257 Error
671(1)
Summary
671(2)
Chapter 15 Database Recovery
673(48)
Types of Database Failures
673(4)
System Failure
673(1)
Fast-Start Fault Recovery
674(1)
Data Center Disasters
675(1)
Human Error
675(1)
Media Failures
676(1)
Extent of Database Failure and Types of Recovery
677(2)
Restoring vs. Recovering a Database
677(1)
Time Needed for Recovery
678(1)
Complete and Incomplete Recovery
679(1)
Open and Closed Recovery
679(1)
Reducing Your Vulnerability
679(1)
Performing Recovery with RMAN
680(3)
Why RMAN Is Best for Recovery
680(2)
User-Managed Recovery of a Database
682(1)
Typical Media Recovery Scenarios
683(15)
Complete Recovery of a Whole Database
683(3)
Recovering a Tablespace
686(2)
Recovering a Data File
688(2)
Incomplete Recovery
690(3)
Recovering from the Loss of Control Files
693(4)
Recovering a Data File Without a Backup
697(1)
Cloning a Database
698(5)
Using RMAN
698(4)
Cloning a Database Manually
702(1)
Techniques for Granular Recovery
703(11)
Tablespace Point-in-Time Recovery
704(1)
Using RMAN for TSPITR
704(1)
Using LogMiner for Precision Recovery
705(6)
Using Flashback Query for Recovery
711(3)
Repairing Data Corruption and Trial Recovery
714(2)
Block Media Recovery
714(1)
Trial Recovery
715(1)
Troubleshooting Recovery
716(3)
The ORA-01194 Error
716(1)
The ORA-01152 Error
717(1)
The ORA-00376 Error
718(1)
Summary
719(2)
Part Five Managing the Operational Oracle Database
721(98)
Chapter 16 Managing the Operational Database
723(48)
Oracle's Automatic Management Features
723(13)
Fully Locally Managed Databases
724(2)
Automatic Undo Management
726(4)
Resumable Space Allocation
730(4)
Automating and Monitoring Recovery Time
734(2)
Easy File Management with OMF
736(6)
Benefits of Using OMF
737(1)
Creating Oracle Managed Files
737(5)
Online Capabilities of Oracle9i
742(18)
Online Data Reorganization
742(3)
Online Table Redefinition
745(6)
Dynamic Resource Management
751(2)
Online Database Block Changes
753(2)
Dynamic Memory Reconfiguration
755(4)
Using Database Quiescing for Online Maintenance
759(1)
Suspending the Database
760(1)
Managing the Online Redo Logs
760(6)
Managing the Archived Logs
764(1)
Managing a Database Link
764(2)
Mapping Oracle Files to Physical Devices
766(2)
Architecture of File Mapping
766(1)
Setting Up File Mapping
767(1)
Tips and Troubleshooting
768(1)
Problems During Quiescing a Database
768(1)
Failed Online Table Redefinitions
768(1)
Problems During Online Index Rebuilds
769(1)
Summary
769(2)
Chapter 17 Using Oracle9i Enterprise Manager
771(48)
Oracle Enterprise Manager
771(7)
Benefits of Using OEM to Manage Databases
773(2)
The Various Systems of OEM
775(1)
The OEM Architecture and Components
776(2)
Configuring OEM
778(14)
Configuring the Intelligent Agent
778(2)
Configuring the Management Server
780(5)
Configuring the OEM Console
785(3)
Configuring Reporting
788(3)
Running the Console from a Web Browser
791(1)
Using the OEM Console
792(1)
Discovering Services
792(1)
The Services.ora File
792(1)
Database Management Through OEM
793(6)
Database Instance Management
794(1)
Database Schema Management
795(1)
Database Security Management
796(1)
Database Storage Management
796(1)
Distributed Database Management
797(2)
Using the OEM Wizards
799(4)
The Export and Import Wizards
800(1)
The Analyze Wizard
801(1)
The Backup Wizard
802(1)
Using the OEM Reporting Features
803(3)
Prebuilt and Custom Reports
804(1)
Accessing the Reporting Web Site
804(2)
Managing Jobs with OEM
806(4)
The Job Detail View
807(1)
Creating a Job
807(3)
Managing Events with OEM
810(2)
Creating Events
810(1)
Specifying the Test Conditions
810(1)
Selecting the Test Criteria
811(1)
Scheduling the Event
812(1)
Configuring E-mail and Paging Notification
812(2)
Configuring Paging Notification
812(2)
Configuring E-mail Notification
814(1)
Oracle Management Packs
814(3)
Oracle Diagnostics Pack
814(3)
Oracle Tuning Pack
817(1)
Oracle Change Management Pack
817(1)
Troubleshooting OEM
817(1)
Summary
818(1)
Part Six Performance Tuning and Troubleshooting the Production Database
819
Chapter 18 Improving Database Performance: SOL Query Optimization
821(66)
An Approach to Oracle Performance Tuning
821(3)
A Systematic Approach to Performance Tuning
822(1)
Reactive Performance Tuning
822(1)
SQL Coding Practices
823(1)
Optimizing Oracle Query Processing
824(4)
Parsing
824(1)
Optimization
824(4)
Query Execution
828(1)
Query Optimization and the Oracle Cost-Based Optimizer
828(11)
Choosing Your Optimization Mode
829(1)
Providing Statistics About the Objects to the Optimizer
829(1)
Setting the Optimizer Mode
830(1)
Setting the Optimizer Level
831(1)
What Does the Optimizer Do?
831(2)
Drawbacks of the CBO
833(1)
Providing Statistics to the CBO
834(5)
Writing Efficient SQL
839(14)
Efficient Where Clauses
839(3)
Using Hints to Influence the Execution Plan
842(1)
Selecting the Best Join Method
843(1)
Using Bitmap Join Indexes
843(2)
Selecting the Best Join Order
845(1)
Indexing Strategy
845(4)
Using the OEM Index Tuning Wizard
849(1)
Monitoring Index Utilization
850(1)
Removing Unnecessary Indexes
851(1)
Using Similar SQL Statements
851(1)
Reducing SQL Overhead via "Inline" Functions
851(1)
Using Bind Variables
852(1)
Avoiding Improper Use of Views
853(1)
Avoiding Unnecessary Full Table Scans
853(1)
How the DBA Can Help Improve SQL Processing
853(7)
Using Partitioned Tables
854(1)
Using Compression Techniques
854(1)
Using Materialized Views
855(1)
Using Stored Outlines to Stabilize the CBO
855(4)
Using Parallel Execution
859(1)
Other DBA Tasks
859(1)
SQL Performance Tuning Tools
860(24)
Using the Explain Plan
861(4)
Using Autotrace
865(5)
Using SQL Trace and TKPROF
870(7)
Using V$SQLAREA to Find Inefficient SQL
877(2)
Using GUI Tools in Tuning
879(5)
A Simple Approach to Tuning SQL Statements
884(2)
Identify Problem Statements
884(1)
Locate the Source of the Inefficiency
885(1)
Tune the Statement
885(1)
Compare Performance
885(1)
Summary
886(1)
Chapter 19 Performance Tuning: Tuning the Instance
887(86)
An Introduction to Instance Tuning
887(3)
Tuning Oracle Memory
890(22)
Tuning the Shared Pool
892(14)
Tuning the Buffer Cache
906(5)
Tuning the Large Pool
911(1)
Tuning PGA Memory
911(1)
Automatic PGA Memory Management
911(1)
Evaluating System Performance
912(8)
CPU Performance
912(7)
Disk I/O
919(1)
Measuring I/0 Performance
920(2)
Is the I/O Optimally Distributed?
921(1)
Reducing Disk Contention
922(1)
The Oracle SAME Guidelines for Optimal Disk Usage
922(1)
Collecting Instance Performance Statistics with Statspack
922(14)
Installing Statspack
923(2)
Using Statspack
925(11)
Measuring Instance Performance
936(18)
Database Hit Ratios
937(1)
Database Wait Statistics
938(14)
Know Your Application
952(2)
Operating System Memory Management
954(1)
When a Database Hangs
954(9)
Handling a Stuck Archiver Process
954(2)
System Utilization Problems
956(1)
Excessive Contention for Resources
957(1)
Locking Issues
957(1)
Abnormal Increase in Process Size
958(2)
Delays Due to Shared Pool Problems
960(1)
Problems Due to Bad Statistics
960(1)
Collecting Information During a Database Hang
960(3)
A Simple Approach to Instance Tuning
963(9)
What's Happening in the Database?
963(1)
Are There Any Long-Running Transactions?
964(1)
Is Oracle the Problem?
965(1)
Is the Network Okay?
965(1)
Is the System CPU Bound?
966(2)
Is the System I/O Bound?
968(1)
Checking Memory-Related Issues
969(1)
Is the System Wait Bound?
969(1)
Eliminating the Contention
970(2)
Summary
972(1)
Chapter 20 The Oracle Data Dictionary and the Dynamic Performance Views
973(56)
The Oracle Data Dictionary
973(2)
How Is the Data Dictionary Created?
974(1)
Using the Data Dictionary Static Views
975(28)
General Views
975(4)
User Management-Related Views
979(8)
Audit-Related Views
987(2)
Storage-Related Views
989(4)
Views for Monitoring Transactions
993(2)
Constraint- and Index-Related Views
995(4)
Views for Managing Database Objects
999(1)
Views for Managing Tables and Views
999(4)
Using the Dynamic Performance Tables
1003(24)
Memory-Related Views
1004(4)
Backup-Related Views
1008(2)
Session- and User-Related Views
1010(2)
Redo Log- and Archive Log-Related Views
1012(3)
Recovery-Related Views
1015(1)
Performance Monitoring Views
1016(2)
SQL-Related Views
1018(1)
Operational Performance-Related Views
1018(4)
General Views
1022(4)
Storage-and File-Related Views
1026(1)
Summary
1027(2)
Chapter 21 Using Oracle PL/SOL Packages
1029(48)
Overview of the Oracle-Supplied PL/SQL Packages
1029(2)
Who Creates the Oracle Packages?
1029(1)
How Do You Use the Oracle Packages?
1030(1)
DBMS_JOB
1031(2)
Using the DBMSJOB Package
1032(1)
Other DBMSJOB Procedures
1033(1)
DBMS_APPLICATION INFO
1033(2)
DBMS_SESSION
1035(2)
Set_Role
1036(1)
Set_Sql_Trace
1036(1)
Switch_Current_Consumer_Group
1037(1)
DBMS_SYSTEM
1037(3)
Set_Sql_Trace_In_Session
1039(1)
Set_Int_Param_In_Session
1039(1)
Set_Bool_Param_In_Session
1039(1)
Set_Ev
1040(1)
DBMS_OUTPUT
1040(2)
DBMS_REPAIR
1042(3)
Using the DBMS_REPAIR Package
1043(1)
Fixing Block Corruption
1044(1)
DBMS_OUTLN and DBMS_OUTLN_EDIT
1045(2)
Using the DBMS_OUTLN Package to Manage Stored Outlines
1045(1)
Tracking the Outlines in the Database
1046(1)
DBMS_SPACE
1047(2)
DBMS_SPACE ADMIN
1049(1)
DBMS_ PROFILER
1050(3)
A Useful Package for Developers
1050(1)
Installing the DBMS PROFILER Package
1051(1)
Using the DBMS PROFILER Package
1051(2)
UTL_FILE
1053(4)
Using the UTL_FILE Package
1054(2)
A Simple Example Using the UTL_FILE Package
1056(1)
UTL_SMTP
1057(3)
Procedures in the UTL_SMTP Package
1057(3)
Using the UTL_SMTP Package
1060(1)
DBMS_SHARED_POOL
1060(2)
DBMS_LOGSTDBY
1062(1)
Oracle Packages in Earlier Chapters
1063(13)
The DBMS_STATS Package
1063(1)
DBMS_RLS
1064(1)
DBMS_FGA
1065(1)
DBMS_RESOURCE_MANAGER
1065(1)
DBMS_RESUMABLE
1066(1)
DBMS_OLAP
1066(2)
DBMS_MVIEW
1068(1)
DBMS_METADATA
1069(1)
DBMS_REDEFINITION
1069(1)
DBMS_FLASHBACK
1070(1)
DBMS_WM
1070(1)
DBMS_LOGMNR
1071(1)
DBMS_REFRESH
1072(1)
DBMS_TTS
1073(1)
DBMS_UTILITY
1074(1)
DBMS_STORAGE_MAP
1075(1)
Summary
1076(1)
Chapter 22 Managing Oracle Databases on Windows and Linux Systems
1077(28)
Oracle9i and Windows
1077(3)
Database Access Methods
1078(1)
Oracle Support for.NET
1078(1)
Integration with Windows Services
1079(1)
Essential Differences in Managing Oracle on Windows and UNIX
1080(8)
Processes vs. Threads
1080(3)
Oracle Service Threads
1083(1)
Services and Daemons
1084(1)
Tuning Memory Resources
1085(1)
CPU and Memory Considerations
1086(1)
Automatic Start-up and Shutdown
1086(1)
Users and Groups
1086(1)
The File Systems
1087(1)
The Windows Copy Utilities
1087(1)
Differences in the Use of the GUI
1087(1)
Automating Jobs
1087(1)
Diagnostic Tools
1088(1)
Installing Oracle9i on a Windows System
1088(1)
The Windows Registry
1089(1)
Using the Registry
1089(1)
Managing Oracle on Windows Systems
1090(11)
Oracle Services
1090(4)
Starting Up and Shutting Down the Oracle Database
1094(3)
Using the Oracle Administration Assistant for NT
1097(3)
Uninstalling Oracle on Windows
1100(1)
Oracle9i and Linux
1101(2)
Oracle's Commitment to Linux
1102(1)
Ensuring You Have a Stable Version of Linux
1102(1)
Managing Oracle on Linux
1103(1)
Summary
1103(2)
Appendix A Brief Oracle9i SQL and PL/SQL Primer
1105
The Oracle9i Sample Schemas
1106(1)
Basic SQL
1107(4)
The Select Statement
1107(2)
The Insert Statement
1109(1)
The Delete Statement
1109(1)
The Update Statement
1110(1)
Filtering Data
1111(1)
Sorting the Results of a Query
1111(1)
The Order By Clause
1111(1)
Sorting Order
1111(1)
Sorting by Multiple Columns
1111(1)
Operators
1112(1)
Comparison Operators
1112(1)
Logical Operators
1112(1)
The Set Operators
1113(1)
SQL Functions
1113(5)
Single-Row Functions
1113(1)
Aggregate Functions
1114(1)
Number and Date Functions
1114(1)
General Functions and Conditional Expressions
1115(1)
SQL Analytical Functions
1116(1)
Hierarchical Retrieval of Data
1117(1)
Selecting Data from Multiple Tables
1118(2)
The Cartesian Product
1118(1)
The Four Types of Oracle joins
1119(1)
Grouping Operations
1120(3)
Nesting Group Functions
1121(1)
The Group By Clause with a Rollup Operator
1121(1)
The Group By Clause with a Cube Operator
1122(1)
The Group By Clause with a Grouping Operator
1122(1)
The Group By Clause with a Grouping Sets Operator
1122(1)
The Having Clause
1123(1)
Writing Subqueries
1123(2)
Top N Analysis
1123(1)
Single-Row Subqueries
1124(1)
Multiple-Row Subqueries
1124(1)
Multiple-Column Subqueries
1124(1)
Advanced Subqueries
1124(1)
The Exists and Not Exists Operators
1124(1)
Abstract Data Types
1125(2)
The Create Type Command
1125(1)
Object Tables
1125(1)
Collections
1126(1)
Type Inheritance
1126(1)
The Cast Operator
1127(1)
Using PL/SQL
1127(3)
The Basic PL/SQL Block
1128(1)
Declaring Variables
1128(1)
Writing Executable Statements
1129(1)
Handling Errors
1129(1)
PL/SQL Control Structures
1130(2)
Conditional Control
1130(1)
PL/SQL Looping Constructs
1130(2)
Cursors
1132(3)
Implicit Cursors
1132(1)
Explicit Cursors
1132(1)
Cursor Attributes
1133(1)
Cursor For Loops
1134(1)
PL/SQL Records
1134(1)
Cursor Variables
1134(1)
Functions
1135(1)
Packages
1135(1)
Oracle XML DB
1136(5)
Storing XML in Oracle XML DB
1137(2)
The Oracle XML DB Repository
1139(1)
Setting Up an XML Schema
1140(1)
Creating a Relational View from an XML Document
1140(1)
Oracle9i and Java
1141(2)
Using Java with Oracle
1141(2)
Summary
1143(2)
Index
1145

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