CART

(0) items

Global Marketing,9780131469198
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Global Marketing

by ;
Edition:
5th
ISBN13:

9780131469198

ISBN10:
0131469193
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $186.66
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $0.08
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Global Marketing
    Global Marketing
  • Global Marketing
    Global Marketing
  • Global Marketing
    Global Marketing
  • Global Marketing
    Global Marketing
  • Global Marketing
    Global Marketing
  • Global Marketing
    Global Marketing
  • Global Marketing Plus 2014 MyMarketingLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card Package
    Global Marketing Plus 2014 MyMarketingLab with Pearson eText -- Access Card Package




Summary

WHAT MAKES THIS BOOK UNIQUE? Warren Keegan and Mark Green approached the fourth edition of Global Marketing with this goal: To write a book that reflects current issues and events, features conceptual and analytical tools that will help the reader apply the 4Ps to global marketing, and is authoritative in content yet relaxed and assured in style and tone.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
PART I INTRODUCTION
1(44)
Introduction to Global Marketing
1(44)
Overview of Marketing
3(5)
Competitive Advantage, Globalization, and Global Industries
4(4)
Global Marketing: What It Is and What It Isn't
8(5)
The Importance of Global Marketing
13(2)
Management Orientations
15(6)
Ethnocentric Orientation
16(2)
Polycentric Orientation
18(1)
Regiocentric and Geocentric Orientations
19(2)
Forces Affecting Global Integration and Global Marketing
21(7)
Driving Forces
21(6)
Restraining Forces
27(1)
Outline of This Book
28(17)
PART II THE GLOBAL MARKETING ENVIRONMENT
45(144)
Global Economic Environment
45(36)
The World Economy---An Overview
46(3)
Economic Systems
49(4)
Market Capitalism
49(1)
Centrally Planned Socialism
49(1)
Centrally Planned Capitalism and Market Socialism
50(3)
Stages of Market Development
53(13)
Low-Income Countries
55(2)
Lower-Middle-Income Countries
57(1)
Upper-Middle-Income Countries
57(2)
Marketing Opportunities in LDCs and Developing Countries
59(2)
High-Income Countries
61(2)
The Triad
63(2)
Marketing Implications of the Stages of Development
65(1)
Balance of Payments
66(2)
World Trade in Merchandise and Services
68(1)
Overview of International Finance
69(12)
Managed Dirty Float
70(1)
Foreign Exchange Market Dynamics
71(1)
Purchasing Power Parity
71(1)
Economic Exposure
72(1)
Managing Exchange Rate Exposure
73(8)
The Global Trade Environment: Regional Market Characteristics and Preferential Trade Agreements
81(36)
The World Trade Organization and GATT
82(1)
Preferential Trade Agreements
83(4)
Free Trade Area
83(1)
Customs Union
84(1)
Common Market
85(1)
Economic Union
85(2)
North America
87(2)
Latin America: SICA, Andean Community, Mercosur, CARICOM
89(9)
Central American Integration System
89(1)
Andean Community
90(2)
Common Market of the South (Mercosur)
92(2)
Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM)
94(1)
Current Trade-Related Issues
95(1)
ASIA-PACIFIC: The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)
96(1)
Marketing Issues in the Asia-Pacific Region
97(1)
Western, Central, and Easter Europe
98(6)
The European Union (EU)
98(2)
The European Free Trade Area (EFTA) and European Economic Area (EEA)
100(1)
Marketing Issues in the European Union
101(2)
The Lome Convention and the Cotonou Agreement
103(1)
Central European Free Trade Association (CEFTA)
103(1)
The Middle East
104(2)
Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf
104(2)
Marketing Issues in the Middle East
106(1)
Africa
106(11)
Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)
106(1)
East African Cooperation
107(1)
Southern African Development Community (SADC)
108(9)
Social and Cultural Environments
117(34)
Society, Culture, and Global Consumer Culture
119(13)
Attitudes, Beliefs, and Values
120(1)
Religion
120(1)
Aesthetics
121(3)
Dietary Preferences
124(2)
Language and Communication
126(3)
Marketing's Impact on Culture
129(3)
High- and Low-Context Cultures
132(1)
Hofstede's Cultural Typology
133(5)
The Self-Reference Criterion and Perception
138(1)
Diffusion Theory
139(4)
The Adoption Process
140(1)
Characteristics of Innovations
140(1)
Adopter Categories
141(1)
Diffusion of Innovations in Pacific Rim Countries
142(1)
Marketing Implications of Social and Cultural Environments
143(8)
The Political, Legal, and Regulatory Environments of Global Marketing
151(38)
The Political Environment
152(9)
Nation States and Sovereignty
153(1)
Political Risk
154(3)
Taxes
157(3)
Seizure of Assets
160(1)
The Legal Environment
161(19)
Common Law Versus Civil Law
162(2)
Sidestepping Legal Problems: Important Business Issues
164(12)
Conflict Resolution, Dispute Settlement, and Litigation
176(4)
The Regulatory Environment
180(9)
Regional Economic Organizations: The European Union Example
180(9)
PART III APPROACHING GLOBAL MARKETS
189(139)
Global Information Systems and Market Research
189(36)
Information Technology for Global Marketing
190(5)
Information Subject Agenda and Environmental Scanning Modes
195(2)
Sources of Market Information
197(2)
Formal Market Research
199(26)
Step 1: Identify the Information Requirement
200(1)
Step 2: Problem Definition---Overcoming the SRC
201(2)
Step 3: Choose Unit of Analysis
203(1)
Step 4: Examine Data Availability
203(2)
Step 5: Assess Value of Research
205(1)
Step 6: Research Design
205(9)
Step 7: Analyzing Data
214(4)
Step 8: Presenting the Findings
218(1)
Headquarters Control of Marketing Research
219(1)
An Integrated Approach to Information Collection
220(5)
Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning
225(37)
Global Market Segmentation
226(16)
Demographic Segmentation
228(7)
Psychographic Segmentation
235(2)
Behavior Segmentation
237(3)
Benefit Segmentation
240(1)
Ethnic Segmentation
241(1)
Assessing Market Potential and Choosing Target Markets or Segments
242(5)
Current Segment Size and Growth Potential
242(1)
Potential Competition
243(1)
Feasibility and Compatibility
244(1)
A Framework for Selecting Target Markets
245(2)
Product-Market Decisions
247(1)
Target Market Strategy Options
248(2)
Standardized Global Marketing
248(1)
Concentrated Global Marketing
249(1)
Differentiated Global Marketing
250(1)
Positioning
250(12)
Attribute or Benefit
251(1)
Quality and Price
251(1)
Use or User
252(1)
Competitor
253(1)
Global, Foreign, and Local Consumer Culture Positioning
254(8)
Importing, Exporting, and Sourcing
262(31)
Organizational Export Activities
264(1)
National Policies Governing Exports and Imports
265(6)
Government Programs that Support Exports
266(1)
Governmental Actions to Discourage Imports and Block Market Access
267(4)
Tariff Systems
271(4)
Customs Duties
274(1)
Other Duties and Import Charges
275(1)
Key Export Participants
275(2)
Organizing for Exporting in the Manufacturer's Country
277(1)
Organizing for Exporting in the Market Country
278(1)
Export Financing and Methods of Payment
279(3)
Documentary Credit
279(1)
Documentary Collections (Sight or Time Drafts)
280(1)
Cash in Advance
281(1)
Sales on Open Account
282(1)
Sales on a Consignment Basis
282(1)
Sourcing
282(11)
Management Vision
283(1)
Factor Costs and Conditions
284(1)
Customer Needs
285(1)
Logistics
285(1)
Country Infrastructure
285(1)
Political Factors
286(1)
Foreign Exchange Rates
286(7)
Global Market Entry Strategies: Licensing, Investment, and Strategic Alliances
293(35)
Licensing
295(3)
Special Licensing Arrangements
297(1)
Investment
298(8)
Joint Ventures
299(4)
Investment via Ownership or Equity Stake
303(3)
Global Strategic Partnerships
306(3)
The Nature of Global Strategic Partnerships
309(7)
Success Factors
311(1)
Alliances with Asian Competitors
312(1)
CFM International, GE, and Snecma: A Success Story
313(1)
AT&T and Olivetti: A Failure
313(1)
Boeing and Japan: A Controversy
314(1)
International Partnerships in Developing Countries
315(1)
Cooperative Strategies in Japan: Keiretsu
316(3)
How Keiretsu Affect American Business: Two Examples
319(1)
Cooperative Strategies in South Korea: Chaebol
319(1)
Twenty-First Century Cooperative Strategies: Targeting the Digital Future
320(1)
Beyond Strategic Alliances
320(1)
Market Expansion Strategies
321(7)
PART IV THE GLOBAL MARKETING MIX
328(174)
Product and Brand Decisions
328(36)
Basic Product and Brand Concepts
329(12)
Product Types
330(1)
Brands
330(2)
Local Products and Brands
332(1)
International Products and Brands
333(1)
Global Products and Brands
333(2)
Global Brand Development
335(4)
Local Versus Global Products and Brands: A Needs-Based Approach
339(2)
``Country of Origin'' as Brand Element
341(3)
Packaging
344(2)
Labeling
344(1)
Aesthetics
345(1)
Product Warranties
346(1)
Extend, Adapt, Create: Strategic Alternatives in Global Marketing
346(8)
Strategy 1: Product-Communication Extension
348(1)
Strategy 2: Product Extension-Communication Adaptation
349(1)
Strategy 3: Product Adaptation-Communication Adaptation
350(1)
Strategy 4: Product-Communication Adaptation
351(1)
Strategy 5: Product Invention
351(2)
How to Choose a Strategy
353(1)
New Products in Global Marketing
354(10)
Identifying New-Product Ideas
355(1)
New-Product Development
356(1)
The International New-Product Department
357(1)
Testing New Products
358(6)
Pricing Decisions
364(37)
Basic Pricing Concepts
365(1)
Global Pricing Objectives and Strategies
366(7)
Market Skimming and Financial Objectives
366(1)
Penetration Pricing and Nonfinancial Objectives
367(1)
Companion Products: ``Razors and Blades'' Pricing
368(1)
Target Costing
369(1)
Calculating Prices: Cost-Based Pricing and Price Escalation
369(2)
Terms of the Sale
371(2)
Environmental Influences on Pricing Decisions
373(7)
Currency Fluctuations
373(3)
Inflationary Environment
376(2)
Government Controls, Subsidies, and Regulations
378(1)
Competitive Behavior
379(1)
Using Sourcing as a Strategic Pricing Tool
380(1)
Global Pricing: Three Policy Alternatives
380(3)
Extension or Ethnocentric
380(1)
Adaptation or Polycentric
381(1)
Geocentric
381(2)
Gray Market Goods
383(2)
Dumping
385(2)
Price Fixing
387(1)
Transfer Pricing
388(2)
Tax Regulations and Transfer Prices
389(1)
Sales of Tangible and Intangible Property
389(1)
Competitive Pricing
389(1)
Importance of Section 482 Regulations
389(1)
Countertrade
390(11)
Barter
391(1)
Counterpurchase
392(1)
Offset
392(1)
Compensation Trading
393(1)
Switch Trading
393(8)
Global Marketing Channels and Physical Distribution
401(34)
Channel Objectives
402(1)
Distribution Channels: Terminology and Structure
403(7)
Consumer Products and Services
403(4)
Industrial Products
407(3)
Establishing Channels and Working with Channel Intermediaries
410(3)
Global Retailing
413(8)
Innovation in Global Retailing
421(2)
Physical Distribution, Supply Chains, and Logistics Management
423(12)
Order Processing
424(1)
Warehousing
424(1)
Inventory Management
424(1)
Transportation
425(4)
Logistics Management: A Brief Case Study
429(6)
Global Marketing Communications Decisions I: Advertising and Public Relations
435(36)
Global Advertising
437(6)
Global Advertising Content: The ``Standardization'' Versus ``Adaptation'' Debate
439(4)
Advertising Agencies: Organizations and Brands
443(4)
Selecting an Advertising Agency
446(1)
Creating Global Advertising
447(9)
Art Directors and Art Direction
450(1)
Copy
450(2)
Cultural Considerations
452(4)
Global Media Decisions
456(3)
Media Vehicles and Expenditures
457(2)
Media Decisions
459(1)
Public Relations and Publicity
459(12)
The Growing Role of Public Relations in Global Marketing Communications
462(1)
How Public Relations Practices Differ Around the World
463(8)
Global Marketing Communications Decisions II: Sales Promotion, Personal Selling, Special Forms of Marketing Communication
471(31)
Sales Promotion
472(7)
Sampling
474(2)
Couponing
476(1)
Sales Promotions: Issues and Problems
477(2)
Personal Selling
479(9)
The Strategic/Consultative Selling Model
481(4)
Sales Force Nationality
485(3)
Special Forms of Marketing Communications: Direct Marketing, Event Sponsorship, and Product Placement
488(14)
Direct Mail
490(2)
Catalogs
492(1)
Infomercials and Teleshopping
493(2)
Sponsorship
495(1)
Product Placement in Motion Pictures, Television Shows, and Other Performances
496(6)
PART V STRATEGY AND LEADERSHIP IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
502(86)
Strategic Elements of Competitive Advantage
502(28)
Industry Analysis: Forces Influencing Competition
503(4)
Threat of New Entrants
503(2)
Threat of Substitute Products
505(1)
Bargaining Power of Buyers
505(1)
Bargaining Power of Suppliers
506(1)
Rivalry Among Competitors
507(1)
Competitive Advantage
507(9)
Generic Strategies for Creating Competitive Advantage
508(4)
The Flagship Firm: The Business Network with Five Partners
512(1)
Creating Competitive Advantage via Strategic Intent
513(3)
Global Competition and National Competitive Advantage
516(6)
Demand Conditions
519(1)
Related and Supporting Industries
520(1)
Firm Strategy, Structure, and Rivalry
521(1)
Chance
522(1)
Government
522(1)
Current Issues in Competitive Advantage
522(8)
Leading, Organizing, and Controlling the Global Marketing Effort
530(31)
Leadership
531(4)
Top Management Nationality
533(1)
Leadership and Core Competence
534(1)
Organization
535(10)
Patterns of International Organization Development
539(6)
Lean Production: Organizing the Japanese Way
545(3)
Global Marketing Management Control
548(4)
Formal Control Methods
550(2)
Informal Control Methods
552(1)
The Global Marketing Audit
552(9)
Setting Objectives and Scope of the Audit
553(8)
The Digital Revolution and the Global Electronic Marketplace
561(27)
The Digital Revolution: A Brief History
562(2)
Convergence
564(1)
Value Networks and Disruptive Technologies
565(2)
Global E-Commerce
567(4)
Web Site Design
571(5)
New Products and Services
576(3)
Broadband
576(3)
Mobile Commerce and Wireless Connectivity
579(3)
Smart Cell Phones
580(1)
Internet Phone Service
581(1)
Conclusion
582(6)
Glossary 588(16)
Credits 604(2)
Author/Name Index 606(6)
Subject/Organization Index 612

Excerpts

Global Marketing,Fourth Edition, builds on the worldwide success ofPrinciples of Global MarketingandGlobal Marketing,Second Edition and Third Edition. Those books took an environmental and strategic approach by outlining the major dimensions of the global business environment. The authors also provided a set of conceptual and analytical tools that would prepare students to successfully apply the 4Ps to global marketing. The authors have approached all four editions with the same goal: to write a book that is authoritative in content, yet relaxed and assured in style and tone. The following student comments suggest that we accomplished our goal: "the textbook is very clear and easy to understand"; "an excellent textbook with many real-life examples"; "the authors use simple language and clearly state the important points"; "this is the best textbook that I am using this term"; "the authors have done an excellent job of writing a text than can be read easily."Principles of Global Marketingwas the first textbook on the subject to be published in a full four-color format. In addition, when it appeared in fall 1996, the first edition invited students to "look ahead" to such developments as the ending of America's trade embargo with Vietnam, Europe's new currency, Daimler-Benz's Smart car project, and the controversy concerning Benetton's advertising. Those topics represented "big stories" in the global marketing arena and continue to receive press coverage on a regular basis. As was the case with the first three editions, we approachedGlobal Marketing,Fourth Edition, with today's students and instructors in mind. Guided by our experience using the text in undergraduate and graduate classrooms and in corporate training seminars, we have revised, updated, and expandedGlobal Marketing,Third Edition. We have benefited tremendously from adopter feedback and input; we also continue to draw on our direct experience in the Americas, Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. The result is a text that addresses the needs of students and instructors in every part of the world. The English-language edition ofGlobal Marketinghas been used in many countries, including Australia, Canada, China, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia, and Sri Lanka; the text is also available in Spanish, Portuguese, and Chinese editions. WHAT'S NEW The fourth edition includes new material on newsworthy and relevant topics such as the expanded European Union, China's growing importance as an export powerhouse and a giant consumer market, the impact of religion on global marketing activities, and the global music industry's ongoing efforts to combat music piracy. Current research findings have been incorporated into each of the chapters. For example, Shaoming Zou and S. Tamer Cavusgil's work on global marketing strategy (fromJournal of Marketing,October 2002) is an important addition to Chapter 1 "Introduction to Global Marketing." Similarly, our thinking about global market segmentation and targeting has been influenced by David Arnold's recent book,The Mirage of Global Markets.We have added scores of current examples of global marketing practices as well as quotations from global marketing practitioners and industry experts. New to the fourth edition is Chapter 17, "The Digital Revolution and Global Electronic Marketplace." Adopters of earlier editions will note that the chapter on strategy and competitive advantage has been moved to Part V; it now is Chapter 15. This change means that the global marketing mix chapters now appear earlier in the book. Throughout the text, organizational Web sites are referenced for further student study and exploration. A Companion Web site ( www.prenhall.com/keegan ) is integrated with the text as well. Each chapter contains several illustrations that bring global marketing to life. C


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...