9780415998000

A Guide to Authentic e-Learning

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780415998000

  • ISBN10:

    041599800X

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 2009-12-01
  • Publisher: Routledge

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Summary

A Guide to Authentic e-learning provides the tools to apply authentic e-learning principles across a range of disciplines, with practical guidance on design, development, implementation and evaluation.

Author Biography

Jan Herrington is a Professor in the School of Education at Murdoch University in Perth, Western Australia. Thomas C.Reeves is a Professor of Learning, Design, and Technology at the University of Georgia, USA. Ron Oliver is Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching and Learning) at Edith Cowan University in Perth, Western Australia.

Table of Contents

List of Figuresp. ix
List of Tablesp. xi
Series Editors' Forewordp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
Impediments to Authentic Learning in Higher Educationp. 3
Inert Knowledgep. 4
Emerging Technologies and Cognitive Toolsp. 7
Technologies of Participatory Culturep. 8
Participatory e-Learningp. 10
Learning Management Systems in e-Learningp. 11
What is Authentic e-Learning?p. 14
The Foundations of Authentic Learning: Situated Learning Critical Characteristics of Situated Learning for a Model of Authentic Learningp. 17
Elements of Authentic Learningp. 18
A Framework for Implementationp. 39
Authentic e-Learning Tasksp. 41
Activity as Practicep. 41
Academic Problems vs Practical Problemsp. 43
Defining Authentic Tasksp. 45
Elements of Authentic Tasksp. 46
Authentic e-Learning Tasksp. 48
The Underlying Logic of Online Authentic Tasks in Higher Educationp. 62
A Logic Map of an Authentic Tasks-based Higher Education Coursep. 65
What is Not Authentic e-Learning?p. 72
Non-authentic Tasksp. 72
Misconceptions of Authenticity of Tasksp. 74
Continuum of Authentic Characteristicsp. 79
How Real does Authentic e-Learning Need to be?p. 85
Increasing Relevance in Learningp. 85
Simulations and Virtual Realityp. 86
Realistic or Real?p. 89
The Nature of Authenticityp. 90
Authentic e-Learning and the Conative Learning Domainp. 97
What should Higher Education Students Learn?p. 98
Are Today's Postsecondary Students "Millennials" or "Generation Me"?p. 103
Alignment is the Keyp. 108
Putting it all Togetherp. 111
Designing and Producing Authentic e-Learning Coursesp. 112
Revising an Existing Coursep. 112
Designing a New Coursep. 114
Implementing Authentic e-Learning Coursesp. 133
Assessment of Authentic e-Learningp. 136
Assessment versus Evaluationp. 136
The Issue of Assessmentp. 137
The Value of Assessmentp. 137
Assessment and Student Learningp. 138
Restraints of Institutional Assessment Policiesp. 139
Characteristics of Authentic Assessmentp. 140
Authentic Assessment for Authentic Learningp. 146
Evaluating Authentic e-Learning Coursesp. 148
Evaluation Planningp. 148
Preparing an Evaluation Proposal: An Examplep. 151
Evaluation Project Managementp. 163
Evaluation Reportingp. 167
Summaryp. 171
Researching Authentic e-Learningp. 172
The Need for a Different Kind of Researchp. 173
Design Researchp. 175
Phases of Educational Design Researchp. 177
Reporting Design Researchp. 187
A Research Agenda for Authentic e-Learningp. 188
Conclusionp. 189
Referencesp. 191
Indexp. 211
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