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How to Read a Novel : A User's Guide,9780312359881

How to Read a Novel : A User's Guide

by
ISBN13:

9780312359881

ISBN10:
0312359888
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
10/31/2006
Publisher(s):
St. Martin's Press
List Price: $21.95
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Summary

There are two approaches: If you're a trusting soul, treat an endorsement as you would the icing on a birthday cake-dip your finger into it, taste and pay up. If you're a suspicious kind of person, treat it as you would the cheese on the mousetrap and keep your hand on your wallet. I'd advise suspicion. Book jacket.

Author Biography

John Sutherland is Emeritus Lord Northcliffe Professor of Modern English Literature at University College London and a visiting professor at the California Institute of Technology. He has published and edited numerous books.  He writes a weekly column for The Guardian, and also writes for The New York Times Book Review and London Review of Books. He was the committee chairman for the 2005 Man Booker Prize.

Table of Contents

chapter 1: So many novels, so little time 1(13)
chapter 2: Declarations of independence 14(13)
chapter 3: Every other thing has changed: why hasn't the book changed? 27(16)
chapter 4: Fiction a four-minute history 43(7)
chapter 5: Targeting first find your book 50(6)
chapter 6: Preliminaries I 56(7)
chapter 7: Closing in 63(18)
chapter 8: Preliminaries II 81(4)
chapter 9: Titles 85(20)
chapter 10: Names 105(5)
chapter 11: Worth a thousand words 110(3)
chapter 12: Famous first words 113(5)
chapter 13: Epigraphs, forewords and afterwords 118(5)
chapter 14: Read one, you've read them all: intertextuality 123(8)
chapter 15: On the rack: know your genre 131(13)
chapter 16: Getting physical 144(6)
chapter 17: See as well as read 150(5)
chapter 18: Hardback or paperback? 155(7)
chapter 19: What do you do with the novel? read it, listen to it, look at it? 162(8)
chapter 20: Real world, fictional world same world? 170(11)
chapter 21: When worlds collide 181(11)
chapter 22: Fiction where the unspeakable can Be spoken 192(7)
chapter 23: I'm a Martian: will understand Pride and Prejudice? 199(14)
chapter 24: Can reviews help? 213(7)
chapter 25: Bestsellers 220(5)
chapter 26: The prize novel 225(4)
chapter 27: Book of the film? Film of the book? 229(9)
chapter 28: After all is said and done, what use are they? 238(6)
Afterword 244(3)
Notes 247(4)
List of illustrations 251(2)
Acknowledgments 253(1)
Bibliography 254


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