9780070228368

Internetworking Ipv6 With Cisco Routers

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780070228368

  • ISBN10:

    0070228361

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1998-02-01
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

A global internetworking guru delivers the hands-on guide to one of he industry's newest and most powerful partnerships the use of IPv6 (the new internet Protocol) with Cisco Routers (specialized computers designed solely to move data through the Internet). Step by step, Gai shows how to migrate from the old IPv4 to today's IPv6, and further reveals how to maximize IPv6 to transmit live audio, and video on demand. This is the first guide to the network layer protocol that will power the Internet and intranets in the next millennium.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Chapter 1 Overview
1(22)
1.1 Why IPv6?
2(4)
1.1.1 Why a New Address Scheme?
3(3)
1.1.2 Best Effort: Is It Enough?
6(1)
1.2 Requirements to Be Met by IPv6
6(9)
1.2.1 An Address Space to Last Forever
7(1)
1.2.2 Multicast and Anycast Addresses
8(1)
1.2.3 To Unify Intranets and the Internet
8(1)
1.2.4 Using LANs Better
9(1)
1.2.5 Security
9(1)
1.2.6 Routing
10(1)
1.2.7 A Good Support for ATM
11(1)
1.2.8 The Concept of Flow
12(1)
1.2.9 Priorities
12(1)
1.2.10 Plug and Play
13(1)
1.2.11 Mobility
13(1)
1.2.12 Transition from IPv4 to IPv6
14(1)
1.3 Choice Criteria
15(1)
1.4 The Path Toward Standardization
16(2)
1.4.1 TUBA
17(1)
1.4.2 IPv7, TP/IX, CATNIP
17(1)
1.4.3 IP in IP, IPAE
17(1)
1.4.4 SIP
18(1)
1.4.5 PIP
18(1)
1.4.6 SIPP
18(1)
1.5 The Evaluation
18(1)
1.6 The Final Decision
19(1)
1.7 Conclusion
19(4)
Chapter 2 An Overview of IPv6
23(16)
2.1 Terminology
24(1)
2.2 Architecture of a Network
24(1)
2.3 Addresses and Names
25(1)
2.4 Routers and Internetworking
26(1)
2.5 The Routing Table
27(1)
2.6 Layer 2 and Layer 3 Addresses
28(2)
2.7 Neighbor Discovery
30(2)
2.7.1 Router Advertisement
30(1)
2.7.2 Router Solicitation
31(1)
2.7.3 Routing Redirect
31(1)
2.7.4 Neighbor Solicitation
32(1)
2.7.5 Neighbor Advertisement
32(1)
2.8 Encapsulation of IPv6 on LANs
32(1)
2.9 Impact of IPv6 on Upper Layers
33(1)
2.10 Modifications to Sockets
34(2)
2.10.1 New Macro Definition
34(1)
2.10.2 Definition of the Data Structure for IPv6 Addresses
34(1)
2.10.3 The socket () Function
35(1)
2.10.4 Interoperability
35(1)
2.10.5 Mapping Names into Addresses and Vice Versa
35(1)
2.10.6 Mapping Binary Addresses into ASCII Addresses and Vice Versa
36(1)
2.11 Domain Name Service (DNS) Modifications
36(1)
2.12 DHCP Servers
37(2)
Chapter 3 IPv6 Headers
39(18)
3.1 The IPv6 Header
40(5)
3.1.1 Version
40(1)
3.1.2 Priority
40(1)
3.1.3 Flow Label
41(1)
3.1.4 Payload Length
42(1)
3.1.5 Next Header
43(1)
3.1.6 Hop Limit
43(1)
3.1.7 Source Address
43(1)
3.1.8 Destination Address
43(2)
3.1.9 Examples of IPv6 Packets
45(1)
3.2 Extension Header
45(10)
3.2.1 Extension Headers Order
46(1)
3.2.2 Options
47(1)
3.2.3 Hop-by-Hop Options Header
48(1)
3.2.4 The Jumbo Payload Option
49(1)
3.2.5 Routing Header
50(1)
3.2.6 Fragment Header
51(1)
3.2.7 The Fragmentation Process
52(1)
3.2.8 Destination Options Header
53(1)
3.2.9 No Next Header
54(1)
3.2.10 Security Header
54(1)
3.3 Size of IPv6 Packets
55(2)
Chapter 4 IPv6 Addresses
57(26)
4.1 The Addressing Space
58(2)
4.2 Syntax of IPv6 Addresses
60(2)
4.3 Types of IPv6 Addresses
62(1)
4.4 The Addressing Model
63(1)
4.5 Assignment of IPv6 Addresses
64(1)
4.6 Unicast Addresses
64(9)
4.6.1 Example of a Unicast Address
65(1)
4.6.2 Aggregatable Global Unicast Addresses
66(1)
4.6.3 Geographic-Based Addresses
67(1)
4.6.4 Link Local Addresses
68(1)
4.6.5 Site Local Addresses
69(1)
4.6.6 The Unspecified Address
70(1)
4.6.7 The Loopback Address
70(1)
4.6.8 IPv6 Addresses with Embedded IPv4 Addresses
71(1)
4.6.9 NSAP Addresses
71(2)
4.6.10 IPX Addresses
73(1)
4.7 Anycast Addresses
73(2)
4.8 Multicast Addresses
75(5)
4.8.1 Predefined Multicast Addresses
77(3)
4.9 Which Addresses for a Node?
80(1)
4.9.1 Addresses of a Host
80(1)
4.9.2 Addresses of a Router
80(1)
4.10 The EUI-64 Interface Identifier
81(2)
Chapter 5 ICMPv6
83(20)
5.1 Protocol Overview
84(1)
5.2 Packets Format
84(1)
5.3 ICMP Message Transmission
85(1)
5.4 Error Messages
86(4)
5.4.1 Destination Unreachable
86(1)
5.4.2 Packet Too Big
87(1)
5.4.3 Time Exceeded
88(1)
5.4.4 Parameter Problems
89(1)
5.5 Informational Messages
90(13)
5.5.1 Echo Request Message
90(1)
5.5.2 Echo Reply Message
91(1)
5.5.3 Group Membership Messages
91(1)
5.5.4 Router Solicitation Message
92(1)
5.5.5 Router Advertisement Message
93(2)
5.5.6 Neighbor Solicitation Message
95(1)
5.5.7 Neighbor Advertisement Message
96(1)
5.5.8 Redirect Message
96(2)
5.5.9 Options Format
98(1)
5.5.10 Source/Target Link Layer Address Option
98(1)
5.5.11 Prefix Information Option
99(1)
5.5.12 Redirect Header Option
100(1)
5.5.13 MTU Option
101(2)
Chapter 6 Neighbor Discovery
103(22)
6.1 Terminology
104(1)
6.2 Link Types
105(1)
6.3 Neighbor Discovery Service
106(4)
6.3.1 Router and Prefix Discovery
106(2)
6.3.2 The Address Resolution
108(1)
6.3.3 Redirect Function
109(1)
6.3.4 Other Functions
109(1)
6.4 Data Structures of a Host
110(3)
6.4.1 Neighbor Cache
111(1)
6.4.2 Destination Cache
111(1)
6.4.3 Prefix List
111(1)
6.4.4 Default Router List
112(1)
6.4.5 An Example of a Cache
112(1)
6.4.6 Possible States Associated with Entries
112(1)
6.5 Transmission Algorithm of a Packet
113(2)
6.6 Neighbor Unreachability Detection
115(1)
6.7 Address Autoconfiguration
116(5)
6.7.1 Stateless Autoconfiguration
116(2)
6.7.2 Site Renumbering
118(1)
6.7.3 DHCPv6 and Stateful Autoconfiguration
119(2)
6.7.4 Duplicate Address Detection
121(1)
6.8 IPv6 on Ethernet
121(4)
6.8.1 Frame Format
121(1)
6.8.2 Link Local Addresses
122(1)
6.8.3 Link Source/Target Addresses
122(1)
6.8.4 Multicast Addresses
122(3)
Chapter 7 The Routing in IPv6
125(26)
7.1 Terminology
126(1)
7.2 Network Model
127(2)
7.3 Routing Algorithms
129(5)
7.3.1 Static Routing
129(1)
7.3.2 Metrics
130(1)
7.3.3 Distance Vector
131(1)
7.3.4 Path Vector
132(1)
7.3.5 Link State
132(1)
7.3.6 Redistribution
133(1)
7.3.7 Multi-Protocol Routing
133(1)
7.4 Routing in IPv6
134(4)
7.4.1 RIPv6
134(1)
7.4.2 OSPFv6
135(2)
7.4.3 IDRPv2
137(1)
7.4.4 Other Routing Protocols
138(1)
7.5 Relationships between Addressing and Routing
138(8)
7.5.1 Internet Structure
139(1)
7.5.2 IPv4 Problems
140(1)
7.5.3 The IPv6 Solution
140(1)
7.5.4 Drawbacks for Users
141(1)
7.5.5 Multihomed Routing Domains
142(3)
7.5.6 Tunnel
145(1)
7.5.7 Private Links
146(1)
7.6 Multicast Routing
146(1)
7.7 Intranet
147(4)
Chapter 8 Security Features of IPv6
151(16)
8.1 Security Features
153(5)
8.1.1 Authentication Header (AH)
153(1)
8.1.2 Authentication Techniques
154(2)
8.1.3 Encrypted Security Payload (ESP)
156(2)
8.2 Key Management
158(2)
8.2.1 Manual Key Management
158(1)
8.2.2 Automatic Key Management
159(1)
8.3 Application of IPv6 Security Features
160(5)
8.3.1 Private Virtual Networks
160(3)
8.3.2 Application-Level Security
163(1)
8.3.3 Routing Security
164(1)
8.4 Future Directions
165(2)
Chapter 9 IPv6 over ATM
167(24)
9.1 Defined Aspects
170(4)
9.1.1 LLC/SNAP Encapsulation
170(2)
9.1.2 VC Multiplexing
172(1)
9.1.3 AAL Type 5
173(1)
9.2 Work in Progress
174(7)
9.2.1 Neighbor Discovery
174(2)
9.2.2 Address Autoconfiguration
176(1)
9.2.3 ICMP Redirect
176(1)
9.2.4 MARS (Multicast Address Resolution Server)
177(1)
9.2.5 NHRP (Next Hop Resolution Protocol)
177(4)
9.3 Alternative Approaches
181(10)
9.3.1 IP Switching
181(3)
9.3.2 Tag Switching
184(3)
9.3.3 Other Approaches
187(4)
Chapter 10 User Mobility in IPv6
191(16)
10.1 Mobility Problems
192(2)
10.2 Operation of a Mobile Host in IPv6
194(1)
10.3 Examples of Operation of a Mobile Host in IPv6
195(2)
10.4 Options Format
197(5)
10.4.1 Binding Update Option
197(2)
10.4.2 The Binding Acknowledgment Option
199(1)
10.4.3 The Binding Request Option
200(1)
10.4.4 The Home Address Option
201(1)
10.5 Characteristics of Nodes
202(1)
10.5.1 General Requirements
202(1)
10.5.2 Router Requirements
202(1)
10.5.3 Mobile Node Requirements
203(1)
10.6 Transmission of Packets to a Mobile Node
203(1)
10.7 Other Functions of Mobile Nodes
204(3)
10.7.1 Mobility Detection
204(1)
10.7.2 Multicast Traffic Handling
204(1)
10.7.3 Home Again
205(2)
Chapter 11 IPv6 and Multimedia Traffic
207(20)
11.1 The Integrated Services Model
209(2)
11.2 Coding of Multimedia Information
211(1)
11.3 Reference Implementation
212(3)
11.4 Traffic Control
215(2)
11.4.1 The Packet Scheduler
215(1)
11.4.2 Buffer Management
215(1)
11.4.3 Packet Classification
216(1)
11.4.4 Access Control
217(1)
11.5 RSVP
217(4)
11.5.1 Flowspec and Filterspec
219(1)
11.5.2 Reservation Styles
219(1)
11.5.3 Reservation by Receiver
220(1)
11.5.4 The Soft-State Approach
220(1)
11.5.5 Routing and Reservations
220(1)
11.6 Integrated Services in an IP over ATM Architecture
221(6)
11.6.1 The Service Model
223(4)
Chapter 12 The Migration from IPv4 to IPv6
227(14)
12.1 Tunneling
229(4)
12.1.1 Alternative Tunneling Schemes
230(2)
12.1.2 IPv6 Addresses with Embedded IPv4 Addresses
232(1)
12.1.3 MTU
232(1)
12.1.4 Hop Limit
233(1)
12.1.5 Default Configured Tunnel
233(1)
12.2 Dual Stack Approach
233(1)
12.3 6-Bone
234(7)
12.3.1 The 6-Bone Node at Politecnico di Torino
235(1)
12.3.2 Registration to RIPE-NCC
236(5)
Chapter 13 Cisco and IPv6
241(16)
IPv6 in IOS(TM)
243(4)
IPv6 commands
247(6)
show ipv6 route
247(1)
show ipv6 tunnel
248(1)
show ipv6 neighbors
249(1)
show ipv6 interface
249(1)
show ipv6 traffic
250(1)
traceroute ipv6
250(1)
ping ipv6
250(1)
ipv6 unicast-routing
250(1)
interface tunnel
250(1)
ipv6 address
251(1)
ipv6 address ... eui-64
251(1)
ipv6 unnumbered
251(1)
ipv6 route
252(1)
ipv6 mtu
252(1)
ipv6 hop-limit
252(1)
ipv6 auto-tunnel
252(1)
RIP Protocol
253(1)
BGP4+
253(1)
ipv6 bgp redistribute connected
253(1)
ipv6 bgp redistribute static
254(1)
ipv6 bgp redistribute rip
254(1)
ipv6 bgp neighbor
254(1)
ipv6 bgp network
254(1)
NAT
254(3)
Appendix A Excerpts from RFCs
257(12)
A.1 Routing Header Pseudo Code
257(1)
A.2 Example of Routing Header Processing
258(1)
A.3 Processing of ICMPv6 Packets
259(1)
A.4 Addresses to Be Used During the Testing Phase
260(3)
A.5 MTU of a Tunnel and Fragmentation
263(1)
A.6 Transmission of IP Packets
264(3)
References
267(2)
Appendix B Analysis of IPv6 Packets
269(10)
B.1 Introduction
269(1)
B.2 Example of Decoding
269(2)
B.3 TCP Packet
271(1)
B.4 UDP Packet
272(1)
B.5 Router Solicitation Packet
273(1)
B.6 Router Advertisement Packet
274(1)
B.7 Neighbor Solicitation Packet
275(1)
B.8 Neighbor Advertisement Packet
276(3)
Appendix C How to Obtain More Information
279(4)
C.1 Author's Address
279(1)
C.2 Author's WWW Address
279(1)
C.3 Mailing List
279(1)
C.4 Where You Can Find RFCs and Internet Drafts
280(1)
C.5 The Playground Server
281(1)
C.6 6-Bone
281(1)
C.7 Other WWW Servers
282(1)
Appendix D Glossary
283(30)
Index 313

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