9780201824988

Introduction to Nuclear Engineering

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780201824988

  • ISBN10:

    0201824981

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2001-03-21
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • View Upgraded Edition

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
  • We Buy This Book Back!
    In-Store Credit: $6.41
    Check/Direct Deposit: $6.10
    PayPal: $6.10
List Price: $260.79 Save up to $65.20
  • Buy Used
    $195.59
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    USUALLY SHIPS IN 2-4 BUSINESS DAYS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

The third edition of this popular book is updated to include a completely revised discussion of reactor technology, an improved discussion of the reactor physics, and a more detailed discussion of basic nuclear physics and models. bull; Introduces the basics of the shell model of the nucleus and a beginning discussion of quantum mechanics. Discusses both U.S. and non-U.S. reactor designs, as well as advanced reactors. Provides for a more detailed understanding of both reactor statics and kinetics. Includes updated information on reactor acidents and safety.

Author Biography

Anthony Baratta is currently a Professor of Nuclear Engineering at The Pennsylvania State University and Director of the Nuclear Safety Center. He received the B.A/B.S. degrees in physics/applied physics from Columbia University in 1968 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Brown University in 1970 and 1978, respectively. His research interests and contributions include reactor safety, reactor kinetics and physics, and the effects of radiation on materials. He has authored many scientific publications and made numerous presentations. He is an active member of the American Nuclear Society and has appeared on many network television and radio broadcasts as an authority on reactor accidents, including the accident at Three Mile Island.

Table of Contents

Nuclear Engineering
1(5)
Atomic and Nuclear Physics
5(47)
Fundamental Particles
5(2)
Atomic and Nuclear Structure
7(1)
Atomic and Molecular Weight
8(3)
Atomic and Nuclear Radii
11(1)
Mass and Energy
11(3)
Particle Wavelengths
14(1)
Excited States and Radiation
15(3)
Nuclear Stability and Radioactive Decay
18(4)
Radioactivity Calculations
22(4)
Nuclear Reactions
26(3)
Binding Energy
29(4)
Nuclear Models
33(4)
Gases, Liquids, and Solids
37(3)
Atom Density
40(12)
References
44(1)
Problems
45(7)
Interaction of Radiation with Matter
52(65)
Neutron Interactions
52(2)
Cross-Sections
54(3)
Neutron Attenuation
57(3)
Neutron Flux
60(2)
Neutron Cross-Section Data
62(6)
Energy Loss in Scattering Collisions
68(6)
Fission
74(16)
γ-Ray Interactions with Matter
90(10)
Charged Particles
100(17)
References
109(1)
Problems
110(7)
Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Power
117(113)
The Fission Chain Reaction
117(2)
Nuclear Reactor Fuels
119(10)
Non-Nuclear Components of Nuclear Power Plants
129(4)
Components of Nuclear Reactors
133(3)
Power Reactors and Nuclear Steam Supply Systems
136(49)
Nuclear Cycles
185(16)
Isotope Separation
201(16)
Fuel Reprocessing
217(2)
Radioactive Waste Disposal
219(11)
References
223(1)
Problems
224(6)
Neutron Diffusion and Moderation
230(36)
Neutron Flux
230(1)
Fick's Law
231(4)
The Equation of Continuity
235(2)
The Diffusion Equation
237(1)
Boundary Conditions
238(2)
Solutions of the Diffusion Equation
240(6)
The Diffusion Length
246(2)
The Group-Diffusion Method
248(4)
Thermal Neutron Diffusion
252(5)
Two-Group Calculation of Neutron Moderation
257(9)
References
260(1)
Problems
260(6)
Nuclear Reactor Theory
266(61)
One-Group Reactor Equation
266(5)
The Slab Reactor
271(3)
Other Reactor Shapes
274(8)
The One-Group Critical Equation
282(4)
Thermal Reactors
286(11)
Reflected Reactors
297(11)
Multigroup Calculations
308(1)
Heterogeneous Reactors
309(18)
References
320(1)
Problems
321(6)
The Time-Dependent Reactor
327(76)
Classification of Time Problems
328(2)
Reactor Kinetics
330(18)
Control Rods and Chemical Shim
348(17)
Temperature Effects on Reactivity
365(11)
Fission Product Poisoning
376(13)
Core Properties during Lifetime
389(14)
References
397(1)
Problems
398(5)
Heat Removal From Nuclear Reactors
403(63)
General Thermodynamic Considerations
404(4)
Heat Generation in Reactors
408(9)
Heat Flow by Conduction
417(11)
Heat Transfer to Coolants
428(13)
Boiling Heat Transfer
441(9)
Thermal Design of a Reactor
450(16)
References
457(2)
Problems
459(7)
Radiation Protection
466(82)
History of Radiation Effects
467(1)
Radiation Units
468(8)
Some Elementary Biology
476(3)
The Biological Effects of Radiation
479(6)
Quantitative Effects of Radiation on the Human Species
485(10)
Calculations of Radiation Effects
495(4)
Natural and Man-Made Radiation Sources
499(7)
Standards of Radiation Protection
506(5)
Computations of Exposure and Dose
511(15)
Standards for Intake of Radionuclides
526(9)
Exposure from γ-Ray Sources
535(13)
Glossary
539(3)
References
542(2)
Problems
544(4)
Radiation Shielding
548(64)
Gamma-Ray Shielding: Buildup Factors
549(10)
Infinite Planar and Disc Sources
559(7)
The Line Source
566(5)
Internal Sources
571(2)
Multilayered Shields
573(3)
Nuclear Reactor Shielding: Principles of Reactor Shielding
576(2)
Removal Cross-Sections
578(6)
The Reactor Shield Design: Removal-Attenuation Calculations
584(4)
The Removal-Diffusion Method
588(2)
Exact Methods
590(5)
Shielding γ-Rays
595(4)
Coolant Activation
599(5)
Ducts in Shields
604(8)
References
605(1)
Problems
606(6)
Reactor Licensing, Safety, and The Environment
612(149)
Governmental Authority and Responsibility
613(1)
Reactor Licensing
614(9)
Principles of Nuclear Power Plant Safety
623(8)
Dispersion of Effluents from Nuclear Facilities
631(19)
Radiation Doses from Nuclear Plants
650(19)
Reactor Siting
669(12)
Reactor Accidents
681(20)
Accident Risk Analysis
701(9)
Environmental Radiation Doses
710(21)
References
721(2)
Problems
723(8)
APPENDIXES
I Units and Conversion Factors
731(6)
II Fundamental Constants and Data
737(8)
III Vector Operations in Orthogonal Curvilinear Coordinates
745(6)
IV Thermodynamic and Physical Properties
751(6)
V Bessel Functions
757(4)
Index 761

Excerpts

Preface to Third Edition This revision is derived from personal experiences in teaching introductory and advanced level nuclear engineering courses at the undergraduate level. In keeping with the original intent of John Lamarsh, every attempt is made to retain his style and approach to nuclear engineering education. Since the last edition, however, considerable changes have occurred in the industry. The changes include the development of advanced plant designs, the significant scale-back in plant construction, the extensive use of high speed computers, and the opening of the former Eastern Block countries and of the Soviet Union. From a pedagogical view, the World Wide Web allows access to many resources formerly only available in libraries. Attempts are made to include some of these resources in this edition. In an attempt to update the text to include these technologies and to make the text useful for the study of non-western design reactors, extensive changes are made to Chapter 4,Nuclear Reactors and Nuclear Power.The chapter is revised to include a discussion of Soviet-design reactors and technology. The use, projection, and cost of nuclear power worldwide is updated to the latest available information. In Chapter 11,Reactor Licensing and Safety,the Chernobyl accident is discussed along with the latest reactor safety study, NURG 1150. A section is also included that describes non-power nuclear accidents such, as Tokai-Mura. The basic material in Chapters 2-7 is updated to include newer references and to reflect the author's experience in teaching nuclear engineering. Throughout the text, the references are updated were possible to include more recent publications. In many topic areas, references to books that are dated and often out of print had to be retained, since there are no newer ones available. Since these books are usually available in college libraries, they should be available to most readers. Chapter 9 is retained in much its same form but is updated to include a more complete discussion of the SI system of units and of changes in philosophy that have occurred in radiation protection. Since many of these changes have yet to reach general usage, however, the older discussions are still included. As in the second edition, several errors were corrected and undoubtedly new ones introduced. Gremlins never sleep!

Rewards Program

Write a Review