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9780134485355

REVEL for The African-American Odyssey, Combined Volume -- Access Card

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  • ISBN13:

    9780134485355

  • ISBN10:

    0134485351

  • Edition: 7th
  • Format: Access Card
  • Copyright: 2017-05-09
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

A compelling story of agency, survival, struggle, and triumph over adversity
Revel™ The African-American Odyssey presents a clear overview of black history within a broad social, cultural, and political framework, instilling in students an appreciation of the central place of African Americans in American history. Authors Darlene Clark Hine, William Hine, and Stanley Harrold trace the long and turbulent journey of African Americans, the rich culture they have nurtured throughout their history, and the quest for freedom through which they have sought to counter oppression and racism. Thoroughly updated to reflect the latest scholarship, the Seventh Edition covers key events during Barack Obama’s second Presidential term, as well as the emergence of the Black Lives Matter Movement.

Revel is Pearson’s newest way of delivering our respected content. Fully digital and highly engaging, Revel replaces the textbook and gives students everything they need for the course. Informed by extensive research on how people read, think, and learn, Revel is an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience — for less than the cost of a traditional textbook.

NOTE: Revel is a fully digital delivery of Pearson content. This ISBN is for the standalone Revel access card. In addition to this access card, you will need a course invite link, provided by your instructor, to register for and use Revel.


 

Author Biography

Darlene Clark Hine is Board of Trustees Professor of African American Studies and Professor of History at Northwestern University. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as past president of the Organization of American Historians and of the Southern Historical Association. In 2014 President Barack Obama awarded Hine the National Humanities Medal (2013) for her work in African American and in Black Women’s History. In 2015, the National Women’s History Project honored Hine for her contributions to women’s history. Hine received her BA at Roosevelt University in Chicago, and her MA and PhD from Kent State University, Kent, Ohio. Hine has taught at South Carolina State University and at Purdue University. She was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies at Harvard University. She is the author and/or coeditor of 20 books, most recently The Black Chicago Renaissance (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2012), Black Europe and the African Diaspora (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2010), coedited with Trica Danielle Keaton and Stephen Small; Beyond Bondage: Free Women of Color in the Americas (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2005), coedited with Barry Gaspar; and The Harvard Guide to African-American History (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000), coedited with Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham and Leon Litwack. She coedited a two-volume set with Earnestine Jenkins, A Question of Manhood: A Reader in U.S. Black Men’s History and Masculinity (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999, 2001); and with Jacqueline McLeod, Crossing Boundaries: Comparative History of Black People in Diaspora (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2000). With Kathleen Thompson she wrote A Shining Thread of Hope: The History of Black Women in America (New York: Broadway Books, 1998), and edited with Barry Gaspar More Than Chattel: Black Women and Slavery in the Americas (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1996). She won the Dartmouth Medal of the American Library Association for the reference volumes coedited with Elsa Barkley Brown and Rosalyn Terborg-Penn, Black Women in America: An Historical Encyclopedia (New York: Carlson Publishing, 1993). She is the author of Black Women in White: Racial Conflict and Cooperation in the Nursing Profession, 1890–1950 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1989). She continues to work on the forthcoming book project, The Black Professional Class: Physicians, Nurses, Lawyers, and the Origins of the Civil Rights Movement, 1890–1955.


Now retired, William C. Hine taught history for many years at South Carolina State University.


Stanley Harrold is Professor of History at South Carolina State University and coeditor of Southern Dissent, a book series published by the University Press of Florida. Harrold has a BA from Allegheny College and an MA and PhD from Kent State University. He has received four National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships, most recently in 2013—14. His books include Gamaliel Bailey and Antislavery Union (Kent State University Press, 1986), The Abolitionists and the South (University Press of Kentucky, 1995), Antislavery Violence: Sectional, Racial, and Cultural Conflict in Antebellum America, coedited with John R. McKivigan (University of Tennessee Press, 1999), American Abolitionists (Taylor & Francis, 2001), Subversives: Antislavery Community in Washington, D.C., 1828–1865 (Louisiana State University Press, 2003), The Rise of Aggressive Abolitionism: Addresses to the Slaves (University Press of Kentucky, 2004), Civil War and Reconstruction: A Documentary Reader (Wiley, 2007), and Border War: Fighting over Slavery before the Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2010). In 2011, Border War won the Southern Historical Association’s 2011 James A. Rawley Award and received an honorable mention for the Lincoln Prize. Harrold has recently published articles in North & South, Organization of American Historian’s Magazine of History, and Ohio Valley History.

Table of Contents

PART I – BECOMING AFRICAN AMERICAN
1. Africa, ca. 6000 bce–ca. 1600 ce
2. Middle Passage, ca. 1450–1809
3. Black People in Colonial North America, 1526–1763
4. Rising Expectations: African Americans and the Struggle for Independence, 1763–1783
5. African Americans in the New Nation, 1783–1820
 
PART II – SLAVERY, ABOLITION, AND THE QUEST FOR FREEDOM: THE COMING OF THE CIVIL WAR, 1793–1861
6. Life in the Cotton Kingdom, 1793–1861
7. Free Black People in Antebellum America, 1820–1861
8. Opposition to Slavery, 1730–1833
9. Let Your Motto Be Resistance, 1833–1850
10. “And Black People Were at the Heart of It”: The United States Disunites Over Slavery, 1846–1861
 
PART III – THE CIVIL WAR, EMANCIPATION, AND BLACK RECONSTRUCTION: THE SECOND AMERICAN REVOLUTION
11. Liberation: African Americans and the Civil War, 1861–1865
12. The Meaning of Freedom: The Promise of Reconstruction, 1865–1868
13. The Meaning of Freedom: The Failure of Reconstruction, 1868–1877
 
PART IV – SEARCHING FOR SAFE SPACES
14. White Supremacy Triumphant: African Americans in the Late Nineteenth Century, 1877–1895
15. African Americans Challenge White Supremacy, 1877–1918
16. Conciliation, Agitation, and Migration: African Americans in the Early Twentieth Century, 1895–1925
17. African Americans and the 1920s, 1918–1929
 
PART V – THE GREAT DEPRESSION AND WORLD WAR II
18. Black Protest, Great Depression, and the New Deals, 1929–1940
19. Meanings of Freedom: Black Culture and Society, 1930–1950
20. The World War II Era and the Seeds of a Revolution, 1940–1950
 
PART VI – THE BLACK REVOLUTION
21. The Long Freedom Movement, 1950–1970
22. Black Nationalism, Black Power, and Black Arts, 1965–1980
23. Black Politics and President Barack Obama, 1980–2016
24. African Americans End the Twentieth Century and Enter into the Twenty-First Century, 1980–2016

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