9780140424591

Selected Works (Earl of Rochester)

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780140424591

  • ISBN10:

    0140424598

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2004-12-15
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics

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Summary

The brightest star at the court of King Charles II, John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester (1647-80), lived a life of reckless debauchery and sexual adventuring that led to his death at the age of thirty-three - described by Samuel Johnson as having blazed out his youth and health in lavish voluptuousness . Rochester was also one of the wittiest and most complex poets of the seventeenth century, writing comic verse, scurrilous satires and highly explicit erotica - from the bawdy self-portrait in The Maimed Debauchee and the tender passion of Absent from thee I languish still to the comic world-weariness of Upon Nothing and A Satyr against Mankind , which mocks human follies. With endless literary disguises, rhymes and alliteration, humour and humanity, Rochester s poems hold up a mirror to the extravagances and absurdities of his age.

Table of Contents

Preface vii
Table of Dates
ix
Further Reading xiii
To His Sacred Majesty
3(1)
To his Mistress
3(2)
Verses put into a Lady's Prayer-book
5(1)
Rhyme to Lisbon
6(1)
Song (Give me leave to rail at you)
6(1)
From Mistress Price, Maid of Honour to Her Majesty, who sent [Lord Chesterfield] a Pair of Italian Gloves
6(1)
Under King Charles II's Picture
7(1)
To his more than Meritorious Wife
7(1)
Rochester Extempore
8(1)
Spoken Extempore to a Country Clerk after having heard him Sing Psalms
8(1)
The Platonic Lady
8(1)
Song (As Cloris full of harmless thought)
9(1)
Song to Cloris (Fair Cloris in a pigsty lay)
10(1)
To Corinna
11(1)
Song (Phillis, be gentler, I advise)
11(1)
[Could I but make my wishes insolent]
12(1)
[The gods by right of nature must possess]
13(1)
To Love
13(2)
The Imperfect Enjoyment
15(2)
On King Charles
17(1)
A Ramble in St James's Park
18(4)
Song (Love a woman? You're an ass)
22(1)
Seneca's Troas, Act 2. Chorus
23(1)
Tunbridge Wells
24(5)
Artemisa to Chloe. A Letter from a Lady in the Town to a Lady in the Country concerning the Loves of the Town
29(7)
Timon. A Satyr
36(4)
A Dialogue between Strephon and Daphne
40(3)
The Fall
43(1)
The Mistress
43(1)
A Song (Absent from thee I languish still)
44(1)
A Song of a Young Lady. To her Ancient Lover
45(1)
A Satyr against Mankind
46(6)
Plain Dealing's Downfall
52(1)
[What vain, unnecessary things are men!]
52(2)
Consideratus, Considerandus
54(1)
Scene i. Mr Dainty's Chamber
55(1)
The Maimed Debauchee
56(1)
A Very Heroical Epistle from My Lord All-Pride to Doll-Common
57(2)
To all Gentlemen, Ladies, and Others, whether of City, Town, or Country, Alexander Bendo wisheth all Health and Prosperity
59(6)
An Allusion to Horace. The 10th Satire of the 1st Book
65(4)
[Leave this gaudy, gilded stage]
69(1)
Against Constancy
69(1)
To the Postboy
70(1)
[God bless our good and gracious King]
70(1)
Love and Life
70(1)
The Epilogue to Circe
71(1)
On Mistress Willis
72(1)
Song (By all love's soft yet mighty powers)
72(1)
Upon Nothing
73(2)
The Earl of Rochester's Answer to a Paper of Verses sent him by L[ady] B[etty] Felton and taken out of the Translation of Ovid's Epistles, 1680
75(2)
Abbreviations and Short Titles of Works Frequently Cited 77(8)
Glossary 85(10)
Notes 95(44)
Index of Titles and First Lines 139

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