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9780231120944

Supervision in Social Work

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780231120944

  • ISBN10:

    023112094X

  • Edition: 4th
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2002-10-01
  • Publisher: Columbia Univ Pr

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

The book provides an overview of the art of social work supervision. It is designed to help the reader understand the place of supervision in the social agency, the functions that it performs, the process of supervision, and the problems with which it is currently concerned. It is intended to provide the knowledge base that is a necessary prerequisite to learning how to supervise. Now fully updated, this new edition inlcudes a wealth of new information on working with minorities and dealing with cultural diversity.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xix
History, Definition, and Significance
1(44)
Historical Development
1(17)
Development of Education for Social Work
7(4)
Developing a Literature on Social Work Supervision
11(4)
Supervision in Group Work and Community Organization
15(3)
Toward a Definition
18(5)
The Functions of Supervision
19(1)
The Objectives of Supervision
20(1)
The Hierarchical Position of Supervisors
21(1)
Supervision as an Indirect Service
22(1)
Supervision as an Interactional Process
22(1)
Supervision as the Means to an End
22(1)
Definition of Supervision
23(1)
Empirical Validation of Definition
23(3)
Ecology of Social Work Supervision
26(4)
Community: General and Professional
26(3)
The Social Work Profession
29(1)
The Social Work Agency
30(1)
The Unit Within the Agency
30(1)
Supervisor-Supervisee Dyad (Supervisee Group)
30(1)
The Demography of Social Work Supervision
30(2)
The Significance of Supervision in Social Work
32(11)
Summary
43(2)
Administrative Supervision
45(34)
Introduction: Organizational Bureaucracy
45(2)
Tasks
47(30)
Staff Recruitment and Selection
47(1)
Inducting and Placing the Worker
48(3)
Work Planning
51(1)
Work Assignment
52(1)
Criteria for Assignment
53(1)
Work Assignment Procedures
54(1)
Problems in Work Assignment
55(1)
Work Delegation
56(4)
Monitoring, Reviewing, and Evaluating Work
60(2)
Coordinating Work
62(1)
The Communication Function
63(1)
Process in Organizational Communication
64(2)
Problems in Organizational Communication
66(2)
Lateral Communication
68(1)
Informal Communication
69(1)
The Supervisor as Advocate
69(2)
The Supervisor as Administrative Buffer
71(3)
The Supervisor as Change Agent and Community Liaison
74(3)
Summary
77(2)
Administrative Supervision: Problems in Implementation
79(50)
The Problem of Vicarious Liability
79(3)
The Problem of Authority and Power
82(2)
Rationale for Authority and Power
82(2)
Supervisory Authority and Sources of Power
84(14)
Reward Power
86(1)
Coercive Power
87(1)
Legitimate or Positional Power
87(1)
Referent Power
88(1)
Expert Power
89(1)
Interrelations Between Types of Supervisory Power
89(5)
Legitimation of Authority
94(1)
Nonauthoritarian Authority
95(3)
Problems in the Implementation of Supervisory Authority
98(13)
Avoidance and Abrogation of Authority and Power by Supervisors
98(5)
Organizational Factors Attenuating Supervisory Power and Authority
103(3)
Supervisee Countervailing Power
106(5)
The Problem of Rules, Noncompliance, and Disciplinary Action
111(16)
The Functional Value of Rules
111(5)
Understanding Noncompliance
116(6)
Monitoring Noncompliance: Supervisor Responsibility
122(2)
Taking Disciplinary Action
124(3)
Summary
127(2)
Educational Supervision: Definition, Differentiation, Content, and Process
129(46)
Educational Supervision Distinguished from In-Service Training and Staff Development
130(1)
Significance of Educational Supervision
131(1)
Relation of Educational Supervision to Administrative Supervision
132(3)
Content in Educational Supervision
135(8)
The Individual Conference
143(20)
Beginning the Conference
143(1)
Structuring and Scheduling
143(3)
Preparing
146(2)
The Middle Phase
148(1)
Teaching and Learning
148(8)
Orientations to Teaching and Learning
156(2)
Providing Helpful Feedback
158(4)
Ending the Conference
162(1)
Process Studies
163(3)
Case Illustration
166(8)
Summary
174(1)
Principles and Problems in Implementing Educational Supervision
175(42)
Conditions for Effective Teaching and Learning: Introduction
175(18)
Principle 1: We Learn Best if We Are Highly Motivated to Learn
176(3)
Principle 2: We Learn Best When We Can Devote Most of Our Energies to Learning
179(4)
Principle 3: We Learn Best When Learning Is Successful and Rewarding
183(3)
Principle 4: We Learn Best if We Are Actively Involved in the Learning Process
186(1)
Principle 5: We Learn Best if the Content Is Meaningfully Presented
187(1)
Principle 6: We Learn Best if the Supervisor Takes Into Consideration the Supervisee's Uniqueness
188(5)
Establishing a Framework for Educational Supervision
193(1)
The Significance of the Supervisor-Supervisee Relationship for Educational Supervision
193(2)
The Supervisor's Problems in Implementing Educational Supervision
195(4)
Differentiating Educational Supervision from Therapy
199(5)
Differences Between Supervision and Therapy
200(1)
Purpose and Focus
200(2)
Difference in Role Relationships
202(2)
Problems in Implementation of Therapy-Educational Supervision Distinction
204(2)
Acceptance of Distinction Between Supervision and Therapy: Empirical Data
206(2)
The Parallel Process Component in Educational Supervision
208(4)
Developmental Supervision
212(4)
Summary
216(1)
Supportive Supervision
217(62)
Introduction and Overview
217(7)
Burnout: Definition and Symptoms
224(3)
Sources of Job-Related Stress for the Supervisee
227(17)
Administrative Supervision as a Source of Stress
227(1)
Educational Supervision as a Source of Stress
228(1)
The Supervisor-Supervisee Relationship as a Source of Stress
229(2)
The Client as a Source of Stress
231(5)
The Nature and Context of the Task as a Source of Stress
236(4)
The Organization as a Source of Tension and Stress
240(2)
Community Attitudes Toward Social Work as a Source of Stress
242(2)
Worker Personality as a Factor in Burnout
244(2)
Implementing Supportive Supervision
246(12)
Prevention of Stress
248(1)
Reducing and Ameliorating Stress
248(10)
Recapitulation and Some Caveats
258(2)
The Value of Supportive Supervision: Research Findings
260(4)
Additional Sources of Support for Supervisees
264(2)
The Client
264(1)
The Peer Group
264(1)
Social Support Network
265(1)
Supervisees' Adaptations
265(1)
Supervisees' Games
266(8)
Manipulating Demand Levels
266(1)
Redefining the Relationship
267(2)
Reducing Power Disparity
269(2)
Controlling the Situation
271(3)
Countering Games
274(2)
Humor in Supervision
276(1)
Summary
277(2)
Problems and Stresses in Becoming and Being a Supervisor
279(50)
Transition: Worker to Supervisor
280(11)
Motives for Change
280(1)
Preparation for Change
281(2)
Changes in Self-Perception and Identity
283(4)
From Clinician to Manager
287(2)
Changes in Peer Relationships
289(2)
Summary: Stress Associated with Becoming a Supervisor
291(1)
Ongoing Supervisor Stress: Problems in Being a Supervisor
291(5)
Ongoing Supervisor Stress: The Challenge of Human Diversity
296(16)
Race and Ethnicity as Factors in Supervision
297(1)
White Supervisor--African American Supervisee
297(2)
African American Supervisor--White Supervisee
299(2)
African American Supervisor--African American Supervisee
301(2)
Gender as a Factor in Transition to Supervision
303(2)
Gender as a Factor in Ongoing Supervision
305(4)
Sexual Harassment: A Problem for Supervision
309(3)
Problems Related to Hierarchical Position
312(3)
Working with Administrators
313(1)
Understanding and Working with Administrators
314(1)
Summary of Stresses Encountered by Supervisors
315(2)
Coping with Stress: Supervisors' Adaptations
317(3)
Supervisors' Games
320(3)
The ``Good'' Supervisor
323(4)
Summary
327(2)
Evaluation
329(60)
Definition
329(2)
Values of Evaluation
331(4)
Value to the Worker
331(2)
Value to the Agency
333(1)
Value to the Client
334(1)
Value to the Supervisor
334(1)
Objectives of Evaluation
335(1)
Dislike of Evaluations
336(4)
Desirable Evaluation Procedures
340(6)
Evaluation Conference: Process
346(4)
Scheduling the Conference
346(1)
Supervisor's Conference Preparation
346(1)
Worker's Conference Preparation
347(1)
Evaluation Conference Interaction
347(3)
Communication and Use of Evaluations
350(2)
Errors in Evaluation
352(3)
Evaluation Outlines and Rating Forms
355(3)
Evaluation Content Areas
358(14)
Sources of Information for Evaluation
372(3)
Evaluation of Supervisors
375(5)
Controversial Questions
380(7)
Summary
387(2)
The Group Conference in Supervision
389(38)
Definition
390(1)
Advantages of Group Supervision
391(8)
Disadvantages of Group Supervision
399(3)
Individual and Group Supervision: Appropriate Use
402(1)
Research on Group Supervision
403(2)
Group Supervision: Process
405(14)
Group Setting
406(1)
Purpose
406(1)
Leadership and Planning
407(3)
Content and Method
410(3)
Supervisor's Responsibility in the Group Conference
413(6)
Humor in Group Supervision
419(1)
Illustration of Group Supervision
420(5)
Summary
425(2)
Problems and Innovations
427(56)
Observation of Performance: The Nature of the Problem
427(6)
Direct Observation of Performance
433(2)
Sitting In
433(1)
One-Way Mirrors
433(1)
Co-therapy Supervision
434(1)
Observation Via Tapes: Indirect Observation of Performance
435(7)
Live Supervision During the Interview
442(5)
Bug-in-the-Ear and Bug-in-the-Eye Supervision
443(4)
Observing Worker Performance: A Recapitulation
447(1)
The Problem of Interminable Supervision
448(6)
Interminable Supervision and Worker Autonomy
449(2)
Attitudes Toward Interminable Supervision
451(3)
Innovations for Increasing Worker Autonomy
454(2)
Peer Group Supervision
454(1)
Peer Consultation
455(1)
Interminable Supervision and Debureaucratization
456(3)
Supervision in the Managed Care Context
459(5)
Administrative Supervision and Managed Care
461(1)
Clinical-Educational Supervision and Managed Care
462(1)
Supportive Supervision and Managed Care
463(1)
Agency Debureaucratization Experiences
464(1)
Problem: The Professional and the Bureaucracy
465(4)
Ethical Dilemmas in Supervision
469(4)
Sexism and Social Work Administration
473(2)
The Problem of Education for Supervision
475(1)
A Perspective: The Positive Values of Professional Supervision
476(4)
Summary
480(3)
Bibliography 483(64)
Index 547

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